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Priestly ends each act on a note of high drama. Write about the way he builds tension towards the end of each act, describe how he leaves the audience plenty to think about during the intervals and after the play has finished

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Introduction

Priestly ends each act on a note of high drama. Write about the way he builds tension towards the end of each act, describe how he leaves the audience plenty to think about during the intervals and after the play has finished Priestly has an ability to build up tension towards the end of acts. A typical example would be at the end of act one. The biggest tension build would be after Shelia's interrogation, when the Inspector mentions that Eva smith changed her name to Daisy Renton. The inspector leaves Shelia and Gerald to talk. After Gerald had admitted to Shelia about his affair, the tension in that act reaches its peak when the inspector enters the room and asks "well?" this is a dramatic device used by Priestly, which heightens the mystery surrounding the inspector. It's almost like the Inspector knew what Shelia and Gerald were arguing about and he is saying well, are you done? Before this when the inspector enters, the stage directions state that the inspector looks steadily and searchingly at them, this is as if the ...read more.

Middle

Act two is continued from act one when the inspector says "well" the stage directions say that the inspector remains at the door for few moments looking at Sheila and Gerald, he then comes forward and repeats "well?" Again, the awkward silence heightens the tension, and the tension in this reaches its summit when Eric enters, after in interrogation of Gerald and Mrs Birling. I think that Priestly ends Act two intensely. By the end the Birling have now realised that Eric fathered Eva Smith's baby and they wait for Eric's return. The stage directions have a lot of dramatic impact on Eric's entrances. The first part of the scene is almost in silence because the inspector has made everybody listen to the front door. The inspector's stage directions have a lot of dramatic impact and tension in itself "Inspector holds up a hand" it seems to me that by the inspector holing up a hand, its as if he is saying "halt", "stop talking" or "listen" without physically speaking. ...read more.

Conclusion

The inspectors final speech probably would have been one of the main things that Priestly wanted the audience to think about after the play, it is a very dramatic and powerful speech, mainly because of the use of language "If men will no learn this lesson they will be taught in fire, blood and anguish". The inspector's speech would have provoked much discussion amongst the audience because of the powerful language used and because the inspector leaved directly after speaking; which again is used to heighten the tension and give a dramatic impact. The most one of dramatic parts in act three has got to be where the characters work out what or who the inspector is, whether he is a real police inspector or a hoax. The Final denouement in Act three would be the phone at the end, announcing that a police inspector is on his way. This guarantees that the audience would leave after the play in a state of shock. Overall I think that Priestly has productively and skilfully used dramatic devices and specific stage directions to carefully structure how tension build gradually in the play. Allison Mulimba ...read more.

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