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Producing Blood Brothers

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Introduction

Bedford Theatre Company 21 Church Street Bedfordshire Dear Mrs Smith I would like the opportunity to present my staging of a scene from Blood Brothers by Willy Russell. The play is set in Liverpool and was written in the 1980's; it was first performed in a secondary school in Fazakerly, a suburb in Liverpool, in 1982. Russell's main intention with the play was to discuss class divisions and was it a bold statement against Thatcherism which he conveyed perfectly through his use of lyrics, music and language. The play is put together from comedy and tragedy in a successful relationship that works. In the scene that I have chosen, Mickey Johnstone and Edward Lyons have been in trouble with the police. The policeman goes to their houses and speaks to their parents; Mr and Mrs Lyons and Mrs Johnstone. I have chosen this scene because it clearly shows class differences between Mickey's family and Edward's family in the way the policeman behaves towards them. ...read more.

Middle

Mrs Johnstone is clearly intimidated by the policeman; she flinches when the policeman looks her in the eye and quickly looks at the floor. The policeman frowns at her as he begins to talk; Mrs Johnstone keeps her mouth shut tight and stares at the floor, wincing when the policeman says the word 'court'- she looks extremely ashamed. As the policeman stalks off she continues to stare at the floor and only when the policeman has left does she look up. She looks withdrawn as if she is having a daydream as she starts to sing. The only light now is a pale spotlight focusing upon her. Mrs Johnstone finishes singing and slowly lets her head bow as she does so the spotlight fades away and the set is dark. The audience feels sorry for her. The stage lights up again on a relaxed scene. The backdrop has changed to a grand living room with a chandelier, an old fashioned radio, a bookcase filled with books and a mantle piece above a fireplace upon which trophies and happy photos crowd together. ...read more.

Conclusion

The policeman's prejudice against the working class contrasts beautifully with his obvious approval of the upper-middle class to clearly show class differences. When the policeman says 'make sure he keeps with his own kind, Mr Lyons' (another piece of prejudice against the working class) he drains his glass, gets up and lets Edward and Mr Lyons show him to the door where the policeman finishes the scene by saying 'well, er, thanks for the drink, sir. All the best now.'- he straightens out his sleeves-'He's a good lad, aren't you Adolph?'- He ruffles Edwards's hair-'Goodnight, sir' the policeman then replaces his hat and leaves. Lights fade and the audience is startled, the end. The scenes - as well as having good drama content - are a bold statement against Thatcherism. The contrast between poor, bullied, working class Mrs Johnstone and rich, pampered, upper-middle class Mr Lyons throws into light how nasty it is. Lower classes should not be bullied and Willy Russell shows this in his work. Yours sincerely ...read more.

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