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Prose Study: English and English Literature Coursework. Conan Doyle developed the Detective Fiction genre into short stories which were called 'pot-boilers'. These were not written for literal context; Doyle only wrote them for earning money. 'The Hou...

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Introduction

Prose Study: English and English Literature Coursework. Conan Doyle developed the Detective Fiction genre into short stories which were called 'pot-boilers'. These were not written for literal context; Doyle only wrote them for earning money. 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' was then written in 1902 at the end of the Victorian era. But Doyle was not the first; the first detective fiction story was written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1841. It was called 'The Murders in the Rue Rogue'. Doyle then developed the genre into the 'pot-boilers'. The Detective fiction genre appealed to the public because in 1829 the Metropolitan Police force were newly established and there was a lot of crime. The high profile case of Jack the Ripper was going on in late 1888. ...read more.

Middle

We always see Watson's admirations for Holmes but in chapter 6 we see some of Holmes' admiration for Watson as he obviously has faith in him if he is leaving Watson to report everything that he thinks is relevant. Chapter 6 is very straight forward and it just shows us Watson's logical approach to things that we don't see because of Holmes. Unlike in further chapters we just read reports and letters that Watson is sending to Holmes. In chapter 6 we read a lot of what Watson thinks and he describes the atmosphere and setting. In an earlier chapter Holmes says to Watson: 'you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light.' We get the typical Detective and assistant from this because Holmes looks down on Watson but he appreciates his contributions because they help him get and establish his ideas. ...read more.

Conclusion

Doyle handles the characters very well; a lot of the characters are very one dimensional and we don't know much about them. Sir Henry is the typical Victorian hero he's noble and strong and is described as very attractive, every Victorian girls dream. But we don't learn much about the other characters such as the Stapletons; we are made aware of their presence and they say that Stapletons sister is a 'lady of attractions'. So we know that they are there but we don't know anything about them. We also are made aware of the Barrymores but again we don't find out anything about them other than that they are the servants. As we read on we learn more and more about all the characters but because it is written in chronological order we don't find out much about them until everything is explained at the end. In every detective fiction novel we have red herrings ...read more.

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