• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Prose Study: English and English Literature Coursework. Conan Doyle developed the Detective Fiction genre into short stories which were called 'pot-boilers'. These were not written for literal context; Doyle only wrote them for earning money. 'The Hou...

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Prose Study: English and English Literature Coursework. Conan Doyle developed the Detective Fiction genre into short stories which were called 'pot-boilers'. These were not written for literal context; Doyle only wrote them for earning money. 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' was then written in 1902 at the end of the Victorian era. But Doyle was not the first; the first detective fiction story was written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1841. It was called 'The Murders in the Rue Rogue'. Doyle then developed the genre into the 'pot-boilers'. The Detective fiction genre appealed to the public because in 1829 the Metropolitan Police force were newly established and there was a lot of crime. The high profile case of Jack the Ripper was going on in late 1888. ...read more.

Middle

We always see Watson's admirations for Holmes but in chapter 6 we see some of Holmes' admiration for Watson as he obviously has faith in him if he is leaving Watson to report everything that he thinks is relevant. Chapter 6 is very straight forward and it just shows us Watson's logical approach to things that we don't see because of Holmes. Unlike in further chapters we just read reports and letters that Watson is sending to Holmes. In chapter 6 we read a lot of what Watson thinks and he describes the atmosphere and setting. In an earlier chapter Holmes says to Watson: 'you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light.' We get the typical Detective and assistant from this because Holmes looks down on Watson but he appreciates his contributions because they help him get and establish his ideas. ...read more.

Conclusion

Doyle handles the characters very well; a lot of the characters are very one dimensional and we don't know much about them. Sir Henry is the typical Victorian hero he's noble and strong and is described as very attractive, every Victorian girls dream. But we don't learn much about the other characters such as the Stapletons; we are made aware of their presence and they say that Stapletons sister is a 'lady of attractions'. So we know that they are there but we don't know anything about them. We also are made aware of the Barrymores but again we don't find out anything about them other than that they are the servants. As we read on we learn more and more about all the characters but because it is written in chronological order we don't find out much about them until everything is explained at the end. In every detective fiction novel we have red herrings ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Conan Doyle section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Conan Doyle essays

  1. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Examine how Conan Doyle ...

    being initiated, with the introduction of a smaller scale mystery than the main mystery. The whole conversation in the opening of the novel between Holmes and Watson is to give the reader a very early idea of the plot which will follow.

  2. Following a careful study of a range of Victorian Short Stories, discuss the ways ...

    majority of people would ever get to witness such a happening, let alone use the new transport, and this vague description would add to the building of tension. As the narrator follows the "descending" path, he enters into insecure isolation within the bowels of the earth.

  1. Pre-1914 Literature Arthur Conan Doyle

    Dr Roylott was a man who would be respected for his status as a doctor, instead he turned to gambling, and that made him a fallen gentleman. A similar situation can be seen in the other novel by Doyle, 'The Man with the Twisted Lip'; Mrs Whitney's husband has taken up a life of drugs: "her husband's trouble".

  2. How is tension built up in the monkeys paw, and in the telltale heart? ...

    But there may be different types of light, such as an eerie light which may be associated with mystery and evil. At the start of the 'Monkeys Paw', 'the night was cold and wet' and 'the fire burned brightly'. This gives a good contrast from the evil and death associated

  1. Sherlock Holmes English coursework

    Sherlock Holmes notices three major clues; the bell pull that doesn't work, a bed bolted to the ground and a ventilator that leads into another room, which doesn't ventilate. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson spend the night in Helens sisters' bedroom.

  2. Why was Conan Doyle's "the hound of the Baskervilles" such a success in Victorian ...

    better perspective on the whole mystery, he felt he needed an unclouded judgement, un-tampered from everyone's views. From his temporary residence he witnessed Mr Stapleton rush out of his house when he heard that Sir Henry was dead and the disappointment when he found out that it actually wasn't Sir Henry.

  1. Question: What features of Arthur Cannon Doyle's a story make them typical of the ...

    a problem strikes the calm atmosphere, drawing you into the story as you become more interlocked with the story line. All Conan Doyle's stories seem to share this factor making them typical of the detective genre. An example of, this would be in 'The Beryl Coronet' when Alexander Holder comes down the street like a 'madman'.

  2. To what extent are chapters 5 and 6 of Doyle's Hound of the Baskervilles ...

    As Watson is the narrator of the novel, we cannot tell what Holmes really thinks of Watson, but only by the way he speaks to him, in the way that is meant to keep him in place, that is, by his master's side.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work