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Red Room and Farthing House comparison coursework.

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Introduction

Red Room and Farthing House comparison coursework. Compare the two ghost stories, 'The Red Room' and 'Farthing House'. You should look at: 1. Different types of ghost story. 2. What you learn about the storytellers. 3. Different types of ghost. 4. Different settings. 5. How the writers create atmosphere and tension. 6. Which you think is the more successful of the two stories. I am going to compare 'The Red Room' by H.G. Wells and 'Farthing House' by Susan Hill. I have a lot to compare, as the 'Red Room' is a very traditional ghost story with a very gothic theme, while 'Farthing House' is a very modern ghost story that uses twists and turns, quite unexpectedly to create suspense rather that fear and also they are separated by the fact that in the 'Red Room' you think there is going to be a ghost and there isn't, while in 'Farthing House', you don't think there is going to be a ghost and there is. In the 'Red Room' there is a man who is going to a haunted room in a castle as a dare to confront the ghost that is supposed to haunt the Red Room. When he gets there he lights all of the candles he can find, but one by one they blow out. ...read more.

Middle

leaves their company and starts his journey through the shadows of the subterranean passageway, and up the penumbra clad spiral staircase to the Red Room, it is evident that he is not as courageous as he makes himself out to be. Not only because he goes to confront a ghost with a gun. But also makes efforts to quell his fear of the dark by collecting as many candles as possible from the hallway outside the Red Room. 'Farthing House's' narrator is a fifty-year-old woman. Although at the time of her experience she was only about thirty. Who, dissimilar too the man. She is writing a letter to her pregnant daughter about the significant experience in her life because she is reminded of it when she smells burning leaves out side her house, just like when she went to Farthing House, and also when she read in a newspaper that a baby was kidnapped on Farthing Close. Two things that both stories have in common is that both ghosts cause a great amount of fear; In the 'Red Room' the man is overwhelmed by his own fear of the dark, and in 'Farthing House' the first time the woman actually sees the ghost she was "soaked in sweat, shaking and terrified" and couldn't get to sleep or throw off her fear and the depression that the ghost inflicted on her. ...read more.

Conclusion

a homely, well run, comfortable establishment, however in the Red Room, you are greeted by three wrinkly, aged people and the cold sense of discomfort and unfriendliness. H.G. Wells uses words like "nervous, haunting, perpetually shifting and half-hysterical" and traditional gothic scenery (darkness, creaking floorboards, shadows etc.) to create the simple, but effective ghost story atmosphere in the 'Red Room', while Susan Hill uses unexpected twists and turns in 'Farthing House' using words like "melancholy, uncertain, distant and unusual" that create tension rather than fear. The 'Red Room' is made frightening by the fact that you know that there is going to be a ghost while in 'Farthing House' rather than fear, suspense which is just as effective, is created by you not knowing there is a ghost. Personally I think the 'Red Room' is the superior of the two accounts although they are both excellent pieces of literature in their own rites. I favour the Red Room because it is not as slow as Farthing House, it is much more lively, exiting and there is more action. I don't think it matters weather a story is believable or not, the 'Red Room' is made successful by its action and 'Farthing House'; by it's true-to-life believability. So overall the 'Red Room' makes an excellent story with frightening exhilarating storyline it follows. Ryan Arbabi 10 F ...read more.

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