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Remind yourself of chapter 1 and 2 of Wuthering Heights. Discuss their effectiveness as an opening to the novel.

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Introduction

Remind yourself of chapter 1 and 2 of Wuthering Heights. Discuss their effectiveness as an opening to the novel. The strange, deliberately confusing opening chapters of the novel are an important part in introducing the world of Wuthering heights and the complex relationships among the characters, as well as the particular narration the story is told. In chapter 1 the use of the narrators is particularly noticeable. The first person narrators give a sense of immediacy as they are directly connected with the situation, however this can also result in a bias point of view. One of the most important aspects of the novel is its second and third manner of narration. The story is told through entries in Lockwood's diary, but Lockwood does not participate in the events he records. The vast majority of the novel represents Lockwood's written recollections of what he has learned from others, whether he is transcribing what he recalls of Catherine's diary entry or recording his conversations with Nelly Dean. ...read more.

Middle

This nature is expressed during the situation with the dogs. Where Heathcliff leaves him in a room of snarling dogs, as he appears not to trust him, luckily the housekeeper saves him. Despite Lockwood being angry he eventually warms to Heathcliff and although his welcoming to Wuthering Heights was anything but that of a warm nature, he volunteers to visit again the following day. Nelly dean is more knowledgeable about events, as she has participated in many of them first hand; this makes her trustworthy in some ways yet biased in others. She frequently miss's her own role in the story's events, in particular when she has behaved badly, however she is generally a reliable source of information. Apart of establishing the manner and quality of the narration another important nature of these early chapters is to fulfil the reader's curiosity about the strange histories of Wuthering Heights. ...read more.

Conclusion

Possibly referring to his appearance on the outside being that of a gypsy and his inner personality that of a gentlemen. Lockwood's tactlessness is also out across in certain situations, making the assumption that Cathy is Heathcliff's wife and Hareton is his son. He also expects Wuthering Heights to be warm and welcoming but instead it is dark and unwelcoming, similar to Mrs, Heathcliff who he had expected to be pleasant due to her pretty appearance however she is rude. This is also apparent in the way Lockwood expects Heathcliff to be pleasant. During one of Lockwood's diary entries in which he is describing his first day as a tenant at Thrushcross Grange, the date 1801 is mentioned. This is significant as it was published in 1847 therefore it is not historical, however it does present how life has changed, so events are not in comprehendible. These opening chapters begin in a calm nature and end in disarray. ...read more.

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