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Representation of women in Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre'.

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Introduction

Representation of women in Charlotte Bront�'s 'Jane Eyre' This essay will discuss the representation of the role of women in the novel 'Jane Eyre' which was written in 1846 by the writer Charlotte Bront�. Charlotte Bront� was born in 1816, the third daughter of the Rev. Patrick Bront� and his wife Maria. Her brother Patrick Branwell was born in 1817, her sisters Emily and Anne were born in 1818 and 1820. In 1820, too, the Bront� family moved to Haworth, Mrs. Bront� dying the following year. She went to Roe Head School, and then she went to the Sidgewick family for 3 months as governess but then returned to Haworth where she was governess to the White family for 9 months. Then her 2 remaining sisters and she became schoolteachers in a school they set up themselves. In 1846 the sisters all released a book under the name 'Bell', Charlotte released 'Jane Eyre', then her brother died, a drug addict and alcoholic, then both her sisters died, she then toured literacy circles in London, in 1854 she got married to a Rev. Niccols, after proposing in 1845 to find rejection from her and her father, when she was expecting a child she caught pneumonia, but would take no cure and died a painful and slow death in 1854. ...read more.

Middle

Her strong belief in gender and social equality challenges the Victorian prejudices against women and the poor. As Jane is from a rich family she sees poverty as being dirty, unnourished, badly treated and basically, below her social status. Jane does not however feel she is of high social standing, as she is not treated as such and constantly told otherwise by the adults in her life. 'Poverty for me was synonymous with degradation.� Jane sees happiness and poverty as two totally unlinked things, this side of Jane shows us she is not all good, and that she is not totally strong as she couldn't live with herself if she went into a lifestyle of poverty. Later in the book we see Jane facing her deepest fear. Jane ends up poor and alone. She does not know how to cope with this sudden poverty as she has always had a good home, even if that was for many years her school. The important characters in the story can include Mrs. Reed, she is a cruel lady who does not like Jane as she is only looking after her out of charity as she is family. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jane goes against the expected stereotype by refusing subservience, disagreeing with her superiors and standing up for her rights by rejecting her love for Rochester. A modern reader could see women are not just cookers and cleaners of the age; that they had lives of their own and goes through a deep and thorough investigation of the lives of women in a stereotyped situation set around in those times. In conclusion I would say this book altogether gives a vivid description and tale of life of women in the nineteenth century, how love is gained not through 'love at first sight' and you have to work on it. It gives a description of the stereotypical males of that age and how they see women as people to do the dirty jobs that men will not do, Charlotte portrays the woman's dream of being the mans need rather than the woman's need for a man in the end of the book, where Rochester welcomes Jane back with open arms, realizing that he will never possess her the way he once wanted to, but that she, in fact, will end up possessing him. Their subsequent marriage not only ends the many conflicts involved, but also fulfils every woman's wish of achieving both independence and love. ...read more.

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