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Requiescat and Mid-term break on the theme of death.

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Introduction

Poetry Coursework Martin Logan S2D After looking at the two poems, Requiescat and Mid-term break, I have seen a poetic way of expressing the feelings shown in the mourning of a death. However, these two poems are quite different even though they are both built around the theme of death. Requiescat uses an ABAB rhyme scheme where as Mid-term Break doesn't seem to have a set rhyme scheme. Both are still effective though and are also probably very sensual as death is a problem that has hit most of us at one time or another. In both of these poems the writers seem to have lost someone close to them. Seamus Heaney's poem 'Mid-term Break' is written about the death of his younger brother while he was away at boarding school. This title may be thought of by some as having a relevance to the breaking of bones as a car hits a person. ...read more.

Middle

In the third stanza of Requiescat, we see that Dickens relates her to lilies and snow...this is significant as snow is reminiscent of peace and tranquillity, lilies are also reminiscent of this, and another significance of this is that lilies are used at funerals. It also says, "she hardly knew" and "so sweetly she grew" showing again this was a premature death. He then goes into the fourth stanza and shows the realisation of her death using phrases like "Coffin-board, Heavy stone" and this may be significant reflecting that this may be weighing him down. He also says: "I vex my heart alone", realising that he will have to live without this person and he also says: "she is at rest", realising that she is dead and is now at peace, and this finalises her death in his mind. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also describes the room which his brother was in, and talks about how "snowdrops and candles soothed the bedside" which suggests innocence and purity. He also speaks about this being the first time he has seen his brother in six weeks and he says "paler now" which suggests bitterness about the death, and he tells us towards the end how he died, saying "Wearing a poppy bruise on his left temple" and "the bumper knocked him clear" and we can see that he has been knocked down. We also find out just how young his brother is, "A four foot box, a foot for every year". Both these poems are on the theme of death and both reflect both writers' feelings about the deaths. They are both very emotional and morbid poems and are similar but contrast as well. ...read more.

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