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Response to Anthem for Doomed Youth

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Response to Anthem for Doomed Youth The British poet Wilfred Owen has implemented down the sonnet, 'Anthem for Doomed Youth.' This poem got its title from another poet. This poem was set during the First World War and describes the conditions of the millions of soldiers who died fighting for their countries. Mr. Owen himself was a soldier who fought for Britain during the war and thus understood the emotions of the soldiers deeply. His observations give us a very useful idea of the exhausting war conditions during the four years of war. "Anthem for Doomed Youth" is a funeral song in which Wilfred Owen conveys his sadness and disgust for the loss of life in World War I. ...read more.


Further on Mr. Owen has personified guns where he says that the battle field is insane. He also conveys the potential damage of the weapons and makes fell the predicament soldiers in at the mercy of an uncontrollable range". I also agree on this with Mr. Owen since one bullet which travelled at an uncontrollable speed could kill a person, and these bullets were fired in ten thousands in each attack. The potential of each attack can therefore not be imagined by anyone unless he/she has fought a war. Since Mr. Owen has fought a war before he would know that and therefore in the next line he has used onomatopoeia to give us a sound image of a war by using the effect of consonance and I feel what he said previously about the war will be true. ...read more.


It will cost a lot of money and time. Besides that it is not appropriate to spend time on someone who is dead. Seen as a whole I can conclude that a war is a dreadful sight and whose benefits are not more than the loss of lives. Soldiers fight for the nation and ended up loosing their lives which indirectly means that even if the country benefits they wont. War is just a source of mass destruction for useless matters. In case of the First World War fourteen millions died and 60milion must have lost the purpose of living. A few entire countries were damaged even though the people didn't want a war. There will be no hope of peace and people will always live in fear. ...read more.

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