• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Review of Silas Marner

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Silas Marner Review Sami Start Silas Marner is a 19th century novel written by a Victorian writer who went by the name of George Elliot (who's real name is Mary Ann Evans). It is her shortest work yet it is very densely packed with a plot that is never dull, subtle characterisations (e.g. Eppie who is the daughter of Silas Marner and is usually shy but very outspoken when is passionate about something like in the argument of who will parent her), more obvious characterisations (e.g. Dunstan, the foolish and greedy thief and brother of Godfrey Cass) and some very complex themes that would have been controversial at the time they were written. These include family (especially parenting of Eppie), religion, true happiness the importance of money, community and the role of status in the community. It is essentially the story of the title character and it accounts after he was unfairly exiled from a northern village after drawing lots was used to reach the unjust conclusion that he committed a certain robbery. ...read more.

Middle

Silas states that he has a stronger claim on Eppie and because she loves him so much she agrees to stay as she is and the Casses give up and leave. The book finishes happily with Eppie marrying a man called Aaron and the last words in the book are Eppie saying '...I think nobody could be happier than we are."' The story starts with the evil seeming triumphant and the good seeming unfortunate (e.g. Dunstan getting Silas's large fortune) however as it starts to conclude it becomes apparent that all the bad deeds have come back to the characters that did them. This message of 'no bad deed goes unpunished' is part of why so many call this George Elliot's 'moral fibre'. I also found it interesting to look at what happens to Silas when he lives for different things; for fifteen years his only passion in life is his money and he has no faith. Elliot says that it makes him happy but I am given the impression that she means it is the wrong type of happiness and that if you put ...read more.

Conclusion

I would give the book a 4/5 for difficulty of reading because of the long and dense sentences and the mature and complex issues that are dealt with. You can read the book more easily if you take less care and don't try to read between the lines however by doing this you would miss a lot of what the book is really about. Because of this I think that it is aimed at adults. It has a gripping storyline and so would be readable for younger people but I think only more mature readers would really understand it. I think that 'Silas Marner' is a very interesting book even if it may be slightly tough to read at parts. I found the Victorian style of writing quite challenging however I would definitely say that I finished it with a feeling of satisfaction and the more I thought about it the more I understood it and the more I looked deeper into it. For these reasons I give it a 3/5 for pleasure. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE George Eliot section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE George Eliot essays

  1. Novelists in the nineteenth century believed not only in entertaining their readers, but also ...

    The lots were drawn in the church where Silas 'knelt with his brethren relying on his own innocence being certified by immediate divine intervention.' However, when the lots were drawn they declared that Silas Marner was guilty. Silas was shocked and grief stricken - his god whom he had devotedly

  2. To what extent do you agree that social and moral analysis is required of ...

    Casaubon was a scholar and a man who had spent many years buried in his own library studying learned books. He wanted to marry Dorothea not because he loved her but for female companionship in his life. George Eliot describes his want for "female tendance for his declining years."

  1. Discuss the themes of outsider in 'Silas Marner' and 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.

    It would have been unrealistic for the jury to find Tom Robinson guilty, due to the time the novel was set in, but the way she has the character of Atticus fight Tom's case shows that he is clearly innocent of the charge.

  2. Compare the style and sentiment expressed in Cider with Rosie and Silas Marner. What ...

    The story of Silas Marner unfolds chronologically. There is a definite story line, which gives the book direction. We learn less about the main character's background and past and there are more characters playing substantial roles with deeper, more detailed characters.

  1. They do the Poet in Different Voices

    They seemed not to be able to exist in each other's company and yet remained together for twenty-two years before T. S. Eliot ran away to America, came back to London, converted to High Anglican, went into hiding and then divorced her, all in a relatively short space of time.

  2. Mary Anne Evans, better known as "George Eliot," was born on November 22nd, 1819, ...

    The house she now inhabited though not nearly as picturesque or substantial as the former home of the Evanses, was yet sufficiently spacious, with a pleasant garden in front and behind it.Though so young she was not only entire mistress of her father's establishment but, as his business required him

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work