• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Review two scenes, which are particularly moving to prove "For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo."

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Review two scenes, which are particularly moving to prove "For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo." Matt Elliman In act 3 scene 1, the turning point of the play occurs; the fight between Mercutio and Tybalt, which leads to both of their deaths. In the previous scene Romeo and Juliet were married and Friar Lawrence ironically says, "These violent delights have violent ends." In act 3 scene 1 there is also talk of violence, which immediately strikes fear into the audience as they know that a fight between the Montagues and the Capulets would cause more hardship for the lovers. The contrast between this and the previous scene causes more pity from the audience who have just witnessed the happy marriage and know from the prologue that the play does not end happily. Since the Montagues "shall not scape a brawl" if they meet with the Capulets in this scene, the audience starts to expect events that will damage Romeo and Juliets' future happiness. ...read more.

Middle

At the end of the scene Romeo is banished from Verona so the audience feels sad for him but more so for Juliet who does not yet know of Romeo's banishment or her cousin, Tybalts death. By having this event straight after the couple's marriage, the audience has more pity for the lovers who have not yet spent time together or had their wedding night, but have already been torn apart. The audience may also fear that Romeo will stay in Verona to see Juliet and therefore be killed. While act 3, scene 1 features Romeo but not Juliet, and more pity felt for Romeo in the scene, pity for Juliet is clearly created in act 3, scene 5 where Juliet not only has to say goodbye to Romeo, but also learns that she must marry Paris in a few days. The language at the start of the scene is very poetic so it seems very romantic, and as Romeo and Juliet are parting the audience can see how much they are in love, which makes their separation more devastating and provokes ...read more.

Conclusion

By the end of the scene Juliet is all alone, and so this would cause the audience to feel her loneliness and create a stronger feeling of suffering and a sense of woe; she has been separated from her new husband, her mother will do nothing to help her; "do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee." And her last friend, her nurse, betrays her. By saying she should marry Paris, "I think you are very happy in this second match, / for it excels your first." The final monologue Juliet speaks at the end of the scene makes the audience see her desperation and sadness and this would very effectively cause a lot of pity and sadness to be felt creating a very moving end to the scene. Juliet decides that if there is no way to escape marrying the County Paris, she will commit suicide, "I'll to the friar to know his remedy; / If all else fail, myself have power to die." These two scenes are very moving they create a strong feeling of pity from the audience and an understanding of the tragedy of the doomed relationship. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work