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Richard III.The main theme in Richard III is the conflict between what is good and what is immoral. Richard represents the most unpleasant qualities of a human soul.

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Introduction

Banos 1 Angela Banos Dr. Rusty Witek English 131.02 15 September 2003 The main theme in Richard III is the conflict between what is good and what is immoral. Richard represents the most unpleasant qualities of a human soul. He is able to cover any dishonest practice pretending that he is acting according to the rules. His ambition is the power that moves the play forward and his only goal is to cause destruction and finally become king of England. I have chosen scene iii in act V, 181-207, to represent the work because this passage shows the conflict between good and evil, one of the main themes in the book. In the beginning of the passage, Richard has just woken up after his visitations by the ghosts. This is the only moment when we can see his conscious talking to him. ...read more.

Middle

No. Yes, I am."(185). Then he says: Banos 2 "O no, alas, I rather hate myself for hateful deeds committed by myself", (190-191), stating that he loves himself to immediately realize he does not, because he has never done any good deeds. This demonstrates the conflict between good and evil, as his own conscience is telling him what a murderer he is. Richard stated at the beginning of the play "I am determined to prove a villain". (30). Instead of feeling like he has achieved his goal, now that he says he has become a villain, he feels afraid. He also explains in this first monologue that he is evil by his very nature. As he is "not shaped for sportive tricks" (14), he is determined to deceive and betray in order to get the crown, which he has already gotten. There was no justification for Richard to behave this way, as his own brother was the king and was not governing in a despotic way. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ultimately, he speaks about the horrifying procession of ghosts saying that "Methought the souls of all that I had murdered came to my tent and every one threat tomorrow's vengeance on the head of Banos 3 Richard"(205-207). He does not demonstrate remorse for his crimes. He is just afraid lf death and will act in the most useful and appropriate way required by the situation: he will find out which of his men will shrink from battle. Richard is evil by nature. He says that, since he was not made to be a lover because of his deformed nature, he will betray and commit as many crimes as he wishes, first in a subtle way and then by openly using force. Yet he seems to have some self conscience in this passage because he realizes how foul his nature is. The conflict between good and evil emerges in Richard himself, which also serves to illustrate the overall theme of the story. ...read more.

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