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Richard lll: Can Richard's behaviour be justified?

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Introduction

Richard lll: Can Richard's behaviour be justified? By Dominique Baptiste Richard's behaviour cannot be justified. Justifying behaviour is making sure his behaviour is morally correct. His behaviour may not be justified, however it can be understood. There are many reasons why his behaviour in the play is atrocious, many of which are psychological. In the Elizabethan era, mental illness was not seen as a socially excepted thing. Mental illness was not understood nor was it known of. In this play by Shakespeare it shows Richard's depression and anxiety which has caused him distress. Richard lll can be compared to Hitler, he wants people to listen to him and wants to be in control and Hitler was compared to the devil, just like Richard had been compared to, "his hell-governed arm hath butchered!". His mind set in the play is quite similar to Hitler's. He wants to be in charge and he wants everyone to obey him. ...read more.

Middle

Richard charms and manipulates Anne and then breaks her heart. Another symptom is "total self centeredness, incapacity for real love and attachment". Richard only marries Anne to prove that he is capable of attracting a lady, "I'll have her, but I will not keep her long". Richard is portrayed as having personality disorders. He is every stressed. Stress is caused by anxiety. His anxiety could be caused by the change in responsibilities or family problems. His mental health is also an issue, psychologist claim that our dreams portray and explain our lives and our subconscious and our unconscious mind. "In thy foul throat li'st! Queen Margaret saw thy murderous falchion smoking In his blood; the which thou once didst bend against her breast, but that thy Brother beat side the point". This shows the family problems that Richard has had when he tried to kill his mother with a sword and his brothers had to pull him away. ...read more.

Conclusion

He realises that she is in a vulnerable and defenceless state and takes full advantage of this. Richard also has an above average intelligence, which means he is always at an advantage. Richard is portrayed as a self obsessed character, throughout the play he reveals his self obsessed personality. He shows that he cannot rely or trust anyone else but himself, " there is no creature that loves me". In one of Richard's last soliloquies after all the ghost of Richard's conscious visit him through his dreams there is a constant repetition of "I". This shows that he does only think of himself "alack, I love myself". Richard plays the concerned uncle when Clarence is killed. He deceives his nephews who are convinced that Richard is their "good uncle Glouchester". Richard fools the young prince in to going to the tower for his own good. He even makes young Prince Edward feel as though he has the power and Richard s just simply helping him "where it seems best unto your royal self". Richard uses his witty dialogue to hide his feelings. "I know none, and therefore am no beast." ...read more.

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