• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Richard the third act 2 scene 2 Elizabeth diary entery

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

This is possibly the saddest day, for I have lost my life in the shape of my Husband. It is not only me who has lost something; my child has lost his father, my mother in law has lost a husband, and the people of this country have lost one of the greatest kings ever to live. My sorrow has no limits, so much so that I would grieve for eternity over my dead husband. I feel helpless now, for my stepping stone, which supported me through my life is gone and I fear all that is possible is for me to sink into the water, into darkness. ...read more.

Middle

When I found out of his death, it felt to me as if I had had a knife stabbed into my back, a knife that refused to come out when I pulled at it, leaving me with eternal agony. I do not fear for my life much any more, but the life of my sons I do. I believe that Richard was the cause of Edwards death and that he will stop at nothing to attain the throne, therefore killing my children. Young Prince Edward is the heir to the throne; so he must be called to London and crowned. While we were deciding this, Richard entered, along with Buckingham, Hastings, Stanley, and Ratcliffe. ...read more.

Conclusion

I felt sorry for my mother in law that she had been put in such a situation to tell her grandchildren that their father was dead. But the duchess told me how she knows how evil her son Richard really is and that he killed his brother, and she grieves that she ever gave birth to him. I can not help feeling the same way. I also fear what will become of me, now I am no longer wife to the king. I fear my days will be short, for it will be not long before Richard decides to kill me Benji Gourgey Diary of Elizabeth 17/10/2008 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Richard III section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Richard III essays

  1. Does Richard the third deserve his reputation?

    He uses winter as imagery for unhappy and lonely times. I think this may be an explanation for his actions in the rest of the play. The soliloquy carries on to show that he is jealous of his older brother the handsome king, he refers to his life as summer to show the comparison between the two.

  2. Is it right to describe Edward the Confessor as a failure?

    Confessor, pg.133, Ailred based his book on Geneology of the kings of the English of the English. ' he defended his kingdom more by diplomacy than by war.' Longman, 1970. 1 Barlow, Edward the Confessor, pg134, Longman, 1970 (Snorri Sturuson, King Harald's Saga, caps.

  1. How does Shakespeare represent female characters in Richard the third?

    However, a very strong character is shown in the same play. Beatrice is a strong minded, outspoken and somewhat swaggering. Especially in her responses when Benedict challenges her, a male character that mirrors her perfectly. If the play were not set in such a loving family environment, she would not be accepted as an honorable wife or possession.

  2. 'In his depiction of Richard III Shakespeare has created much more than a simple ...

    The last part of his monologue tells us the foundations to his complicated web of schemes, alliances, plots and so forth that he will eventually achieve his ultimate goal - to become king of England. The complexity and sophistication involved in it is the one big reason why Shakespeare has

  1. King Richard the Third

    to become King, arguing again that his deformities prevent him from achieving what he wants, 'Yet so much is my poverty of spirit, So mighty and so many my defects, That I would rather hide from my greatness' 5 The reader may sense almost a double irony at this statement,

  2. 'In his depiction of Richard III Shakespeare has created much more than a simple ...

    He openly tells the audience of his plot to reach the throne and remove all the people standing between him and the throne. It is at this point where Richard shows qualities displayed by few villains; he makes the audience co-conspirators.

  1. How Genuine was the Relationship Between Richard and Buckingham?

    This statement is very ironic as he is effectively cursing himself and sealing his own fate. This speech states that, if Buckingham ever does any wrong towards the Queen or her family, then he should be punished by being deceived in a false friendship-which is exactly what happens later in the play.

  2. This excerpt is taken from the very first act of Shakespeare's play 'Richard III', ...

    believe that Richard had murdered the two boys, but that he had been murdering people a long time before his brother Edward IV's death. Writers were able to take advantage of this willingness to accept a certain story by embellishing the truth and making stories far more dramatic than they

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work