• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Romeo and Juliet – What Are Your Early Impressions of the Situation and Characters up to Act 1 Scene 3 Line 50? What Can You Pick Up about the Future of the Play?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Romeo and Juliet - What Are Your Early Impressions of the Situation and Characters up to Act 1 Scene 3 Line 50? What Can You Pick Up about the Future of the Play? Knowing that the play is a tragedy, it can be told from the title alone that two people called Romeo and Juliet will die before the play is over. However the manner and reason for their death is unknown, and therefore the scenes leading up to their deaths will to their best to explain this. Scene 1 starts not with any of the major characters, but with two servants if the Capulets, Sampson and Gregory. These two have high impressions of themselves, and they crudely joke and mock each other. 'I will take the wall of any man or main of Montague's.' 'I am a pretty piece of flesh.' 'Tis well thou art not fish; if thou hadst, thou hadst been poor-John.' This gives the impression that they are young men, and therefore very self-important when talking to each other. They also boast of their 'manhood', their ability, and will to kill any male Montague and bed any female one. 'I will push Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids to the wall.' ...read more.

Middle

Why call you for a sword?' Lady Capulet is some years younger than her husband, who is now far too old in her opinion for fencing in the streets, and so she holds him at bay. Lady Montague keeps her husband peaceful in a different way, by simply telling him sternly 'Thou shalt not stir one foot to seek a foe.' This shows us that the two Lords are easy to be angered and do care about the respect of their family name, however the are not particularly violent men, unlike some of their juniors, and can be held back by a restraining hand. When Romeo arrives he speaks to his good friend Benvolio about how his 'sad hours seem long.' He says that he is out of favour, disliked by a woman with whom he is infatuated. Romeo seems inexperienced in love, yet has learnt a lot about it. He knows enough to spout classic, stereotypical love poetry, which comes directly from his head and not his heart. Romeo however knows of no other way that he can tell Benvolio how he feels for this girl. He is reluctant to tell him her name however. 'In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.' Benvolio of course knew this, and Romeo is just lingering on the subject, drawing it out to give it an importance that it does not have in from Benvolio' s perspective. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is ironic as not only will the Nurse live to see Juliet marry (which happens sooner than she would have expected and liked) but she will also live to see her die, just a few days after the wedding. Mercutio is the Montague equivalent of Tybalt. He is violent, troublesome, and always ready for a fight. He is not, however a Montague, and comes from an entirely different family. You wonder how he has met the gentle and peaceful Benvolio and Romeo, and become such great friends with them, as he is so unlike to them. Mercutio is also someone who does not care what others think of him. 'What care I what curious eye doth cote deformities?' If he wears a visor, some people may think he has a less than desirable face, but he could not care less. Mercutio does not even need a mask, for he has been invited to the party. He still wishes to gatecrash anyway, and this is a clear sign of his troublesome persona. You feel that Benvolio and Romeo will not benefit from their friendship of Mercutio at all, and that he will only bring them trouble. With Mercutio and Tybalt on opposing sides, they stand to do a lot of damage during the play. David Swift 10H ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. Discuss the dramatic importance of the Nurse in Act 1 Scene3, Act 2 Scene ...

    The Nurse's final words in this scene are to Juliet, The words she speaks stay ringing in are ears as the play unfolds. 'Go, girl, seek happy nights to happy days.' The Nurse loves Juliet and is just saying that she should do what makes her happy.

  2. Are Male Characters Stereotyped as Violent and Crude? Discuss. Consider Events Up to Act ...

    Many of the noble characters use blank verse in normal conversation, but when they are experiencing ignoble emotions such as aggression and sex they speak in prose like uneducated lower class citizens. It is the first scene which introduces the idea of love having two meanings, and stereotypes men as lewd and provocative.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work