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Romeo and Juliet

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Romeo and Juliet Act 3, scene 5 is one of the most dramatic and crucial scenes of the play, showing a vast range of emotions, themes and issues, including tension, pain, heart-break, love and death. The scene begins with an intense feeling of separation, as Romeo must leave Juliet or face almost certain death, 'I must be gone and live, or stay and die'. This tension gives the audience a great sense of empathy for both Romeo and Juliet as their undoubted love must once again be torn apart. At the beginning of the play Romeo is portrayed as the 'love sick puppy,' risking his life to meet with Juliet in the balcony scene. Juliet is a contrast, she is sensible and realistic compared to the naive Romeo. However, these positions and characteristics are completely reversed in this scene as Juliet becomes so engrossed with her love, she begs Romeo not to leave despite the danger he would face if he stayed, 'Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day: it was the nightingale, and not the lark.' In distinction, Romeo becomes practical and knows what he should do and what would happen if he doesn't, 'It was the lark, the herald of the morn, No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks do lace the serving clouds in yonder east.' The use of poetic love language is present throughout the opening of the scene and describes the 'star-crossed' immense feelings of turmoil, confusion and deep love for each other, in a very romantic way, 'Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.' The use of analogies, calling the stars 'Night candles' and describing sunrise as tiptoed 'on misty mountain tops' is very effective and poetic, it is almost like their emotions are too strong to describe with simple words and sentences. Great anxiety is created with the constant references to death and a hint to the inevitability of a tragic ending. ...read more.


you mad' as does Juliet trying to calm her father while carefully trying not to fuel his anger any further: 'Her me with patience'. Juliet pleads to her father and tries to calm the situation by appealing to her father's good nature and emotions, but her pleas are no use as Lord Capulet quietens her with more vindictive taunts, telling her that if she does not marry Paris, then she can't 'look him in the face'. The Nurse is Juliet's last chance as her father begins to threaten her, her mother isn't protecting her and her husband is not there to help her so she finally defends Juliet fearing that things were going to far: 'God in heaven bless her.' She too becomes defiant towards authority and accuses Lord Capulet: 'You are to blame, my lord, to rate her so.' This is a brave move for the nurse as it was unthinkable for a servant to disobey a master in such an unconcealed way. Capulet is unsure how to handle this obvious deviancy by a servant in front of his family and begins to mock the Nurse, sarcastically calling her 'Lady Wisdom' and 'Good Prudence', but quickly dismisses her and tells her to 'hold your tongue'. The Nurse retaliates, cautious not to cause too much offence: 'I speak no treason.' At this period in time servants are not permitted to express any sort of opinion, especially towards the master of the house and when the nurse asks, 'may not one speak?' This infuriates Lord Capulet and he orders her to 'Peace, you mumbling fool! He tells her go and go and gossip somewhere else with her old women friends 'For here we need it not' ' Lord Capulet begins to feel threatened as he is now, not only being defied by his daughter and female servant, but his own wife is now telling him he is over reacting: 'You are too hot', Unlike the careful questioning we here from Lady Capulet earlier, this is ...read more.


O most wicked fiend!' This use of language is almost parallel to that used previously by her father, and it is once Juliet expresses her true thoughts and feelings, that we discover how alike she is the Lord Capulet as she constantly begins to echo her fathers nature. Like Lord Capulet, Juliet is now too been betrayed and have both disowned the person they love, she even mimics her father's misuse of power and authority, in this case the servant - mistress relationship by lying to the Nurse in order to get her own way. In this soliloquy, Juliet gives the audience an insight to exactly how she feels, which she has been so enthusiastic to disguise throughout the scene, it again gives the audience a superior knowledge to the rest of the characters of the play as they know exactly what she plans on doing and what extent she is prepared to take herself to. Juliet completely abandons the Nurse - as did her father to her- 'Thou and my bosom henceforce shall be twain', this means that Juliet will no longer confide in her Nurse, nor care for her in the way she had done for the whole of her life. At the end of the scene. Shakespeare uses a rhyming couplet in order to emphasise Juliet's last resort: 'I'll to the friar, to know his remedy: if all else fail, myself have power to die'. This means that Juliet will now go to the friar to ask for help, showing that she has no desire to consort or reconcile with any of the adults in her life. However, if this fails then she would rather kill herself than marry Paris, this demonstrates her stubbornness and dogmatic character, similar to that found within her father. The fact that Juliet threatens to kill herself is quite ironic, as at the end of the play, she does in fact, commit suicide. The scene concludes with a traumatised Juliet, feeling distraught and completely alone, contemplating her inevitable tragic and desolate future, she is a girl totally miserable and distressed. Danielle Lawrence 1 ...read more.

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