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Romeo and Juliet Act 3, scene 1 is a pivotal scene in the play. Explain how you would direct this scene, with reference to the play as a whole and other film versions of the scene you have observed.

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet Act 3, scene 1 is a pivotal scene in the play. Explain how you would direct this scene, with reference to the play as a whole and other film versions of the scene you have observed. Act 3 Scene 1 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is the pivotal scene in the entire play. In this scene Benvolio attempts to convince Mercutio not to get into a brawl with the Capulets however, Mercutio insists that they stay, whilst they are talking Tybalt enters, Mercutio is up for a fight but Benvolio thinks it would be best if they left. Up until the commencement of Act 3, Scene 1, the relationship between Romeo and Juliet is blossoming. This scene changes everything for them, the tragic events that follow alter their futures forever; A brawl takes place that leads to the murder of Tybalt by Romeo and the death of Mercutio. This incident shapes the fateful end for the star-crossed lovers. From this scene the audience is made aware of the serious consequences of the two killings, and feels increasing sympathy for Romeo and Juliet. Benvolio realizes the danger that lies ahead, and due to the history between the two feuding families is trying to convey the possibility of a fight if they do not go. Benvolio should speak in a worried and alarmed tone in order to highlight the impending dangers. The words that should be emphasized are "lets retire", "hot", "not 'scrape a brawl", "hot days", and "mad blood stirring". The reason for this is to highlight the danger he is talking about, and Shakespeare uses images such as "hot" to emphasize danger. ...read more.

Middle

Tybalt uses condescending tones and language such as "boy", in order to patronise Romeo's youth and to show dominance, and the 'injuries' refer to the hurt and betrayal that Tybalt feels because Romeo invaded the Capulet ball. I think Romeo would speak in a rather fast pace, I say this because he is quite anxious at this point and seems like he is not going to take anymore of Mercutio's nonsense but at the same time he does not want to start up a fight so he would prefer to stay calm. I believe that Mercutio says 'o' and had '!' in the end of his sentences, in a calm way to try and calm Romeo down so that he would not lose his temper with Tybalt, which he knows would obviously lead to a fight. So yes, I would say he says it in a sincere way. But he also says 'o' and has '!' at the end of the sentence to show he is being funny, to make the atmosphere more humorous. Mercutio fights Tybalt because Romeo refuses and Mercutio sees this as dishonourable. I also think Mercutio fights Tybalt because he believes he is stronger and does not want to look weak by not taking up a fight. He has got to the point where Tybalt has really annoyed and irritated him and the only way to get over that feeling is to fight him. When Mercutio asks Tybalt to step forward to fight I believe he thinks that Tybalt would be too scared to take up his offer. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lady Capulet does not believe what he says; she would obviously not believe him because she will want to think the best of her family. So she tries her hardest to defend them, which is what she is trying to do. When Lady Capulet is saying these lines I think she should become slightly aggressive to show that she is trying her hardest to defend her family. When the prince announces that he wants to 'exile' Romeo this is a very emotional part of the scene because he always wanted to be with Juliet and he will not get his chance, not only from his side but also from Juliet's side because she will not be happy knowing that he will be exiled. During the Regeneration period of stories, that was recurring by new writers, who put forward more ideas to these stories. These writers took these stories and added their own ideas to them and recreated a story. They basically turn them into their own story. However, Shakespeare rarely ever made-up the plots himself. Initially Masuccio Solernitano wrote the story of Romeo and Juliet in Italian in 1476. In 1562 a poet named Arthur Brooke published a long poem 'The tragicall Historye of Romeo and Juliet'. This is where the basis of Shakespeare's play came from. However, Shakespeare drastically changed the importance and formation of Brooke's storyline. After Shakespeare finished and was satisfied with his changes to the play he published 'Romeo and Juliet' in quarto in 1597. This is how Shakespeare got his entire story ideas from and how he came to make the play of Romeo and Juliet. ...read more.

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