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Romeo and Juliet: Act 3 Scene 5

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Introduction

GCSE English Coursework: Romeo and Juliet: Act 3 Scene 5 Juliet's situation at the being of act 3 scene 5 is complicated because of the feud between the Capulets and the Montagues and the fight in scene 1 of this act. Tybalt's death has led to Romeo's banishment. Following the secret marriage between Romeo and Juliet they share their first night together before Romeo must go to Mantua. On the morning after their first night of marriage, it could be argued that she is loved completely by Romeo and also the nurse who always sides with Juliet. She is then forced to find her own inner strength as she is isolated from her family. In act 2 scene 2 we get the impression that Juliet is someone who is decisive and free from the prejudice of her family proving she has an independent mind. The impression is formed because she has her own views on the Montague and Capulet feud. Juliet's question to Romeo is an attempt to persuade him to stay longer by saying are you leaving and it's not day. The imagery associated with night and day begins to create tension because at the start, Juliet wants Romeo to stay and we know if he gets caught he will be killed. ...read more.

Middle

Following the entrance of Capulet Shakespeare again uses dramatic irony in the words by which Lady Capulet sides with her husband rather than her daughter by being sarcastic. She does this by saying "ay, sir, but she will none, she gives you thanks" which means in modern English she won't have anything to do with it, thank you very much. When Juliet turns to her mother her words extend the dramatic irony earlier used by her mother; she unconsciously anticipates her tragic outcome. Lady Capulet, although shocked at the force her husband's anger still refuses to offer Juliet any support showing she is being deserted by everyone. Our first impressions of Capulet as a father are formed when he is first approached by Paris in act 1 scene 2 lines 9-10 and 14-19. We see him showing consideration for Juliet. This shows she was loved completely. We have also formed impressions of Capulet during the banquet when Tybalt insists that Romeo is removed. He is probably enjoying the party and doesn't want any trouble in his house, showing he likes to be in charge and likes to rule the household. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think this because she tells Romeo at the being of the scene to stay because she doesn't want him to leave her, but she knows if he's stays and gets caught he will be killed. Now I think she's making everyone desert her by going against them. By doing this she will be benefiting because she will get to be with Romeo. Juliet now finds the strength of her decisive character in order to stand alone, despite the expectations of her family by confiding in Friar Lawrence who is outside her family. In my own opinion she didn't make the appropriate moral choice because if she and Romeo fail she will have no family to turn to. This scene has huge dramatic impact on the rest of the play, setting the scene for everything that follows. Shakespeare uses a variety of different language to put across different moods. At the start of the scene, the language and mood is very light and happy. This shows off Romeo and Juliet's love for each other. Shakespeare uses the language very cleverly here, putting across the playful and happy attitude of the two and then changing it suddenly to a dark mood as Romeo leaves, because Juliet wants him back. ...read more.

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