• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Romeo and Juliet as a tragedy of fate.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Romeo and Juliet as a tragedy of Fate It has always been the dearest hope of mankind that the twists and turns of life, a seemingly random progression of sheer coincidence, are in fact a part of the designs of some higher order. Somewhere, we reason, there must exist an emergent pattern to the chaos of our existence. To this intangible being who directs our course we have assigned the name of fate. It is fate, and not humble human choice or character, that steers Romeo and Juliet to the tragedy of their deaths. Shakespeare creates a clear path for us to follow, as omniscient spectators, to watch as fate manifests herself through a tightly knit web of chance events. Shakespeare makes it clear on several occasions that fate is in control, and that destiny and not flaw in character directs the tragedy. Fate controls the destiny of Romeo and Juliet through a series of coincidences, which is set into motion by the opposition of the houses of Montague and Capulet. ...read more.

Middle

In many other places does Shakespeare suggest fate to be the mover of the plot. Romeo, before attending the Capulet masque, has a vague premonition of the actions of fate. I fear too early, for my mind misgives Some consequence yet hanging in the stars Shall bitterly begin his fearful date With this night's revels, and expire the term Of a despised life closed in my breast By some vile forfeit of untimely death But he that hath the steerage of my course Direct my sail.... [I. iv. 113-120] In Romeo's eloquent statement, Shakespeare clearly indicates that fate will steer the lovers' course. Romeo again calls upon the element of destiny at the realization of what Tybalt's death encompasses. Oh, I am Fortune's fool! [III.i.142] And again when he learns of Juliet's supposed death. Is it e'en so? - Then I defy you, stars! - [V.i. 25] Another omen through which Shakespeare propagates his central theme of the inevitability of fate is the recurrence of dreams. ...read more.

Conclusion

Yet it is fate who pits their good intentions against one another, not a flaw in reasoning or character. Fault lies not with Friar Laurence for his haste, Friar John for his lack of perseverance, Romeo for his infatuation, or even the servant for his illiteracy. Fate, and not flaw in character, directs the tragedy. Fate mans the helm of the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet. Through a series of related coincidences, fate steers the course of the play. Each event brought about by chance contributes to the eventual outcome, and to the eventual reconciliation of the feuding families. In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare clearly states the central role of fate as the driving force behind the movement of the plot. Finally, through no single character can it be said that the tragedy is brought about. Fate works her will through the acts of a number of characters, on whom none can be laid blame. Fickle fate, love and bane of men, rules the storyline of Shakespeare's most well-loved tragedy. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This is a very well written essay; however the actual analysis lacks depth and at times relevance to the question. Make sure that analysis of language, structure and form are the basis for your writing.

4 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 06/06/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. Diary entries for Juliet

    never see him again, if he goes there is a chance I could see him again, the nurse started calling and Romeo was gone, my heart sank.

  2. Romeo's Character Development

    I think his friend regard his behaviour as silly and they believe that he is just spoiling everybody's fun. Romeo's character changes in Act 1 Scene 5, when he and his friends, Mercutio and Benvolio arrive at the Ball. Romeo is searching for Rosaline, but instead sets his eyes on Juliet.

  1. Romeo and Juliet: What dramatic function does conflict serve in this story

    will kill him and the reason that Romeo loves him because he has married his cousin. Tybalt finds it offensive that Romeo is saying he loves his sworn enemy Tybalt then insults Romeo 'Boy. This shall not excuse the injuries that thou hast done me, therefore turn and draw'.

  2. Romeo and Juliet: Love vs. Hate

    Juliet is very independent and demonstrates this by proposing marriage to him. She matures throughout the play, going from being a na�ve young girl that depends on her family a lot to a woman who is willing to desert them for her true love.

  1. How Does Shakespeare Present The Character Of Romeo Montague?

    Later on in the scene, Romeo poetically describes Juliet's eyes to be, "two of the fairest stars", in which Shakespeare, through this metaphor, effectively reveals Romeo's passion and adoration for Juliet. Shakespeare introduces a new persona to Romeo in the following scenes.

  2. "Romeo and Juliet, the 'star-crossed lovers', are doomed from the start, not by fate, ...

    She is one of Juliet's closest friends. She is very loving and fond of Juliet and only has her best interests at heart. This might be because the Nurse's daughter died when she was young, so she sees Juliet as her child. The Nurse and Friar Lawrence seem to have quite a bit in common in their involvement in Romeo and Juliet's situation.

  1. The concept of fate - Romeo and Juliet

    Although Lord Capulet refused to allow bloodshed that night, Tybalt swore that he would have revenge for the insult. He hissed, "I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall, / Now seeming Sweet, convert to bitt'rest Gall" (I, iv, ll. 206-207).

  2. Comparing two versions of Romeo & Juliet (Zefferelli and Baz Luhram).

    Romeo crashes his car into Tybalt� s car. The two make their way out of the wreckage and Tybalt pulls out his gun. The rain starts pouring down and this is another sign that something bad is about to happen.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work