• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10

Romeo and Juliet can be seen to be a play full of oppositions, how far does act 1 scene 5 fit with this description of the play.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Romeo and Juliet can be seen to be a play full of oppositions how far does Act 1 Scene 5 fit with this description of the play Romeo and Juliet can definitely be seen to be a play full of oppositions for example: Capulet and Montague, life and death, love and hate, reconciliation and continuation of the feud and light and dark. These oppositions can be seen throughout the play and many of them also occur in act 1 scene 5. Indeed many of the references to oppositions that occur in act 1 scene 5 have a link with how other oppositions are displayed in earlier or latter scenes, this could be because act 1 scene 5, in my opinion, is one of the most important scenes in the whole play. It is the scene in which Romeo and Juliet fall in love. It is the turning point when some of the main oppositions become more apparent in the play. For example love and hate would have not really been an issue if they had never met. Act 1 scene 5 has a surprisingly large range of oppositions. One of the ways the oppositions in this scene are displayed so effectively and made so apparent by Shakespeare is the idea that each character can be seen to display elements of these opposing themes. Tybalt demonstrates hate, Romeo love, Juliet saint, Romeo sinner. There are many more oppositions besides these which are not relative of a particular character. ...read more.

Middle

in the form of the writing Shakespeare uses rhyming couplets when Tybalt exits to express his hatred of Romeo: "Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting: I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall, Now seeming sweet convert to bitt'rest gall." (Act I, Scene V, lines 88-91) This shows that his anger is prepared and wanted. He chooses to be angry and the fact that it is written in rhyming couplets is significant because when compared to normal text, prose, it seems prepared and not spontaneous. The same can, in a way, be said for Romeo and Juliet's saints and sinners sonnet possibly showing that they were destined to be together. Reconciliation and continuation of the feud is another important opposition throughout the play and most obviously in Act 1 scene 5. Shakespeare uses Tybalt and Capulet to represent these oppositions Tybalt being continuation and old Capulet reconciliation. When Tybalt sees Romeo he sets off to kill him but is stopped by old Capulet who refuses to let Tybalt harm Romeo: "Content thee gentle coz, let him alone, 'A bears him like a portly gentleman;" (Act I, Scene V, Lines 64-65) This quotation shows the audience that Capulet is perhaps tiring of the feud and wants to resolve the issue and stop all the violence. He is telling Tybalt to leave Romeo alone as he has done nothing wrong and goes on to say that Tybalt should "bear him like a gentleman". ...read more.

Conclusion

However Romeo's "do what he dare" suggests that he will do anything to have the love of Juliet, even if it means death. There are not many quotations in act 1 scene 5 showing freewill but ideas can be got out of the text as a whole. One good example is the nurse trying to stop Juliet finding out who Romeo is this is an example of freewill because she is trying to go against fate and stop Romeo and Juliet getting to know each other. Whilst trying to dissuade Juliet from taking things further with Romeo i.e. getting to know him she says "Marry that I think be young Petruchio." (Act 1, scene 5, line 130) This is showing the audience that the nurse really does not want Juliet to meet this man, and that it is because she knows who he is the only son of Montague. However she is unwilling to tell Juliet this is to protect Juliet's feelings, the Nurse is very fond of Juliet. She says earlier in the scene that the man who can marry Juliet will be rich she possibly thinks that this is Romeos incentive for wanting to marry Juliet. Marry is a mild oath showing that the Nurse is frustrated and not used to keeping things from Juliet. Shakespeare seems to leave the theme of fate running throughout the play perhaps to remind the audience that there is no way to change destiny and also so they do not forget what is going to happen to the characters. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    'How is Love Presented in Romeo and Juliet in Acts - 1 Sc 5; ...

    4 star(s)

    Juliet continues to show her despair and hopelessness in their last meeting, she even 'thinks' that the last they meet will be in a tomb, "Methinks I see thee now, thou art so low, As of one dead in the bottom."

  2. Marked by a teacher

    How does Shakespeare convey the theme of love and conflict in the Prologue, Act ...

    4 star(s)

    the villian lives (showing great hatred for Romeo; she wants to have him dead) which slaughter'd him.'', thinking that her daughter weeps for Tybalt, whilst she does so for Romeo. By making Juliet say these double meanings, Shakespeare is perhaps trying to make it seem that she is very intelligent

  1. In 'Romeo And Juliet' there is anger, love and violence. Discuss these elements in ...

    Tybalt protests but Capulet sticks to his original view. Tybalt is furious and walks off muttering to himself that he will not forget what has happened that night. As Romeo is watching Juliet, Tybalt becomes more annoyed; "It fits when such a villain is a guest. / I'll mot endure him."

  2. Romeo and Juliet - What different types of love are represented in the play, ...

    This is very tragic as his dying wish is to be forever with his love Juliet in her tomb. This obviously does not happen, because Romeo loves her and is in despair thinking that she is dead and then ends his own life to be with her.

  1. Explore the dramatic effect of Act 3 Scene 1 in Romeo and Juliet. In ...

    At this point Tybalt does not know about the marriage, between Romeo and Juliet, and so cannot understand Romeo's reluctance to fight. This is dramatic irony, as the audience has seen the marriage, and can see Tybalt's confusion, as they know something that Tybalt does not.

  2. Why is Act 1 Scene 5 an important scene in Romeo and Juliet?

    In this scene, Tybalt presents the theme of hatred as his hatred is just as strong as Romeo and Juliet's love. Shakespeare contrasts these themes to show the audience something bad is about to come and to keep them interested in different aspects of the play.

  1. didn't think I would ever fall in love, come to think of it I ...

    where, Ty, Kelly, Chantay, Dre, T, and J.D were talking and laughing. 'Hey guys' I said to them all. Dre winked at me and everyone else said hi, Romeo went over to his boys to greet them. 'Shandrea always has to be the late one' we all laughed because it

  2. In Romeo and Juliet there are lots of opposing themes. Explore how the themes ...

    This gives the impression that Verona is permanently linked to death. The final scene in this act, scene 6, is the point at which true love finally runs its course, and Romeo and Juliet are married. Romeo says something very prophetic in this scene.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work