• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Romeo and Juliet, commentary on Act 3, Scene 1

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Romeo and Juliet: Commentary on extracts. Act 3, Scene 1 This extract is from the play entitled 'Romeo and Juliet', written by William Shakespeare. It can be found in act three scene one, where a fight is about to start between Mercutio, Benvolio, Romeo and Tybalt. This scene clearly portraits the enmity between Capulet and Montague, and through Tybalt's and Mercutio's death, we can see to what extent the characters are willing to fight in order to defend their honour and families. Patriarchy was very important in those days, the world was dominated by men and their honour codes, which meant that they had to fight to defend their honour. This explains Mercutio's shock when he sees Romeo refusing to fight against Tybalt and he says in line 40: "O calm, dishonourable, vile submission". ...read more.

Middle

Since the moment they met, Romeo and Juliet knew the hateful society would allow them to be happy easily. In this extract we can see that Shakespeare includes Mercutio. This character is important because he is the one used by the author to make puns. Not only Shakespeare loved puns, but the whole Elizabethan society enjoy hearing them. Mercutio's commentaries give the play scapegoat to all the drama and allow the audience to have fun while watching the play. One example of the use of puns can be seen in lines 6 and 7, when Benvolio says: "And but one word with one of us? Couple it with something; make it a word and a blow." Another characteristic of Mercutio is that he was always willing to fight. ...read more.

Conclusion

A fight is about to start between characters that hate themselves, and added to this, they are in a public place where according to Benvolio in line 19: "...here all eyes gaze on us." The fact that they were in a public place makes tension even worst because they weren't allowed to fight in the streets of Verona. The author builds up tension gradually. At the beginning the tone was light heated, but as Tybalt and Romeo appear, tension begins to rise. Shakespeare probably made this in order to create more suspense and make a more interesting play for the audience. As a conclusion, we can say that in this extract, part of the most important theme of the play is developed and explored. Love versus hate is the most important theme, and in this case, the author shows clearly the enmity and hate between the families, feelings that finally lead to the death of the main characters. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Writing to Inform, Explain and Describe section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Writing to Inform, Explain and Describe essays

  1. How does Shakespeare create tension and keep the audiences attention in Romeo and Juliet ...

    But Tybalt is still unaware of this adding more tension. More tension is added because we know Tybalt is after Romeo and we are waiting to find out what he is going to do with him. When Romeo enters Tybalt says 'here comes my man' and again Mercutio takes this the wrong way and pretends Tybalt means servant.

  2. How does Shakespeare create a sense of tension and drama in act 3, scene ...

    Capulet begins with a calm manner and his attitude and mood are both positive. He says "How now, a conduit, girl?" Capulet is showing interest in Juliet's emotions and is worried about her well-being. He is being calm, considerate, quiet, personal and kind.

  1. Romeo and Juliet

    Romeo is still restrained and more mature. This can be proved by when he turns down Tybalts request and says "but I love thee better than I canst devise". He doesn't wish to fight Tybalt since than he is happy because he has married Juliet.

  2. Great expectations

    is an important setting for a number of relationships that are formed throughout the story. Another setting that is very significant in the story is London. This is again a very important setting because it is where a lot of the change in Pip's lifestyle takes place and he becomes a very different person while he is here.

  1. How does Act 3 Scene 1 create dramatic tension in Romeo and Juliet?

    However his remarks are ignored discarded as Romeo enters the scene.'Well, peace be with you, sir: here comes my man' Romeo enters the high tension scene as various insults are thrown at him.' Romeo, the hate I bear thee can afford .No better term than this,--thou art a villain.'

  2. How important is the theme of conflict in Romeo and Juliet?

    They try to escape from the conflict by death. That's how death helps to mend the ancient quarrels between both families. Just before the end of the ancient quarrel, the feud between the families kills the lovers passively. In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare writes in sonnet form in order to point to the play's themes of love and the

  1. How does Shakespeare create a sense of drama in Act 3, Scene 1 of ...

    In this Tybalt is basically saying, 'I will leave this now but I will get him later'. Leaving a threat like this hanging is a very effective way of creating tension and drama among the audience because the audience now realize how strong the feud is and are almost certain that a fight is approaching.

  2. Romeo and Juliet

    He holds unorthodox beliefs about sexual relationships, sports, and community events. His insecurity about his size and status makes him discontented with the World State. Bernard's surname recalls Karl Marx, the nineteenth-century German author best known for writing Capital, a monumental critique of capitalist society.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work