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Romeo and Juliet CourseworkAnalyse the dramatic effects of Act 1, scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet

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Romeo and Juliet Coursework Task: Analyse the dramatic effects of Act 1, scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet There are many components of Shakespeare's classic, 'Romeo and Juliet', which mainly consist of love, hate and honour. This is the story of the incessant love of two young people, which crosses the borders of family and convention. It encompasses love, hate and tons of emotion, tragically ending with the harsh reality of death. There are many imperative events leading up to act 1, scene 5, and various other events that take place in this specific scene. Possibly the most important and the utmost obvious fact that the audience discern about is about the two families, The Capulets and The Montagues. Shakespeare describes these families as 'both alike in dignity', who are both fighting for their family honour. We know that this conflict had become so transmittable that even the servants of the households have become physically involved. The most astonishing fact is that the two families had been at a feud for so long (Shakespeare describes this as ancient) ...read more.


This implies that he is affected by her presence. The second line tells us that she is not like the other girls and Romeo uses effective yet intimate imagery to portray this. The third and fourth lines are also using expansive use of imagery:' as rich as a jewel in an Ethiop's ear- beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!' Romeo's contemplation towards Juliet results in his speech and these purely imaginative lines show this. An Ethiop's ear is a very dark brown, practically black in colour and when Romeo amalgamates the use of 'a rich jewel' and an Ethiop's ear, it purely captivates the audience and implies clever use of Juxtaposition and a complementary statement. He describes Juliet as '...- beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!' here Romeo shows, enthusiastically, how affectionate he is. He exemplifies her as too good for the earth and furthermore valuable. This unmistakably shows the integrity of his first glance corresponding to Juliet. ...read more.


Immediately after this incident, Romeo decides to take action as he now knows what real love is. Romeo takes Juliet's hand and engages into conversation. He says: 'If I profane...' to '...holy palmers kiss'. He says that his hand is unworthy compared to hers and he is generally asking her for a kiss. She accepts the offer and they have a kiss. He asks again and she kisses him a second time. She also praises him for his unique kissing talents baring in mind that a kiss then would have been a sin in them days and is not as seen to in modern times. In that type of social life, a kiss was more significant and she is also one of the most popular person's daughter so it is going to ruin their reputation. Romeo and Juliet also use a vast range of religious language such as palmers, sin, and pilgrim ETC this shows that their kiss was not just a one-off, however it was deep and passionate and almost a religious experience to both of them. Romeo and Juliet Coursework By Aitshaam Shahzad 10SRA 10Bronte ...read more.

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