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Romeo and Juliet have no one to blame but themselves. To what extent do you agree with this statement?

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Introduction

Romeo and Juliet have no one to blame but themselves. To what extent do you agree with this statement? Right from the first page in the book, it becomes apparent that this story will end badly. The two families 'ancient grudge' is the first insight of many under-lying occurrences, each one having a fundamental influence on the end result. Blame is a strong word of accusation that can only be used once a thorough understanding of events has been established. Hence, to blame only Romeo and Juliet would be biased, as they alone cannot be held responsible. There are many other factors, which may be blamed for the tragedy that separately have little consequence. It is only when these factors are combined, that such an outcome can be achieved. The prologue describes Romeo and Juliet as 'a pair of star-crossed lovers,' as though the stars had already mapped out their fates. Fate is signalled throughout the play by an intricate series of premonitions. ...read more.

Middle

This is how Romeo discovers about the Capulet ball, and it is at this party that Romeo and Juliet fall in love. Fate seemed to control their lives and force them together, becoming the ultimate controlling power. Each of these aspects of fate play an important role leading to the story's conclusion, but without the actions of other characters, their contribution would be meaningless. The well-meaning Friar for example. He disregarded all sense and agreed to the couple's marriage in a last bid for peace. His actions may have been with good intentions, but ultimately had he used common sense and said no to begin with, the tragedy may have never occurred. It is arguable however, the amount of blame that can be placed on this decision, for if Romeo and Juliet felt that strongly it is without doubt that they would have explored other alternatives. Either way, it is the Friar's actions from this point forward that really condemn him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Likewise, Romeo says, 'Is she a Capulet? O dear account.' Yet, they still chose pursue the relationship. Love is often considered an impulsive emotion and Romeo, being an impulsive person acted upon his instant feelings and sought Juliet at her balcony. An example of Romeo's impulsiveness was when he chased and killed Tybalt, in avenge for Mecrutio's death. Juliet also promoted the relationship and it was originally her idea for the two to wed. They deliberately disobeyed their parents, got themselves in strife and relied on the Friar to save them. Romeo and Juliet give us an image of the gloriously exulted state of loving and being loved that subsumes all other considerations. For them it ends in death because they cannot have they love they want. With all aspects taken into account, Romeo and Juliet retained only a small amount of the blame. Condemning the lovers' right from the very beginning, fate plays a role all the way through. Considering the time the play was written in, fate was obviously thought to be very important in life. ...read more.

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