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Romeo and Juliet - How appropriate as an introduction to the events of the play have you found the opening scene to be?

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Introduction

GCSE English Coursework - "Romeo and Juliet" Task: How appropriate as an introduction to the events of the play have you found the opening scene to be? The opening scene is very appropriate as an introduction to the events of the play as it prepares us for what is to happen. The prologue actually tells us that there will be death involving a "pair of star-crossed lovers". Act I Scene I gives us an insight into their parents "strife" and "rage" which we were told about in the prologue. In the first scene we are introduced to many important main characters. The scene starts with two servants of the Capulet household playing off each other's words, through use of puns and wordplay, in friendly banter, involving a lot of innuendo. ...read more.

Middle

Tybalt's character is established as a fiery aggressive youth who says himself that he hates the word peace. He is very much prepared for fighting and action as opposed to Benvolio who tried to stop the fighting. We are then introduced to Lord and Lady Capulet and Lord and Lady Montague as the fight escalates. Shakespeare is building the tension as the citizens get involved and we see that they don't appreciate this ongoing feud between the families. This implies that there have been incidents that have happened before. There is still some humour even in this very tense state as Lady Capulet mocks her husband when he calls for his sword: "A crutch, a crutch, why call you for a sword?" ...read more.

Conclusion

This then prepares the audience for Romeo to find someone else and it also gives us something to compare his love for Juliet to. There are many dramatic affects in Act I Scene I that make it appropriate as the opening scene to the play. It is filled with variety and contrast and prepares us for developments in the themes. The variety is in the language (i.e. Shakespeare uses both poetic and comic language) and between the two themes of hate/love, romance/fighting and this keeps the audience interested. It introduces us to many important characters and also prepares us for the dramatic irony concerned with Romeo being in love with the idea of being in love and thinking he can never love anyone else but Rosaline. Because of all the contrast in Act I Scene I, I think that the opening scene is very appropriate as an introduction to the play. Amy Radford GCSE English Coursework ...read more.

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