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Romeo and Juliet theatre production essay.

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Introduction

Richard Tandy English coursework: Romeo and Juliet theatre production essay * Introduction For this piece of coursework I will explore and explain five tense and dramatic scenes from the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. Using these scenes I will explain how a production at the Globe Theatre could have been presented to the audience of the time, to maximise the drama and the characterisations. In addition, I will consider how audience reaction and participation have changed over the centuries with varying approaches to the presentation of the story. Before proceeding with this essay I will now briefly explain some of the factors which coincide with the requirements of this essay question. For example, I will give a brief summarization of the story of Romeo and Juliet, an outline of some details about the Globe theatre, and a brief review of the rest of the essay question, for example, some of the factors which would influence how a production at the Globe Theatre could have been presented to the audience of the time, to maximise the drama and the characterisations. The famous story of Romeo and Juliet, based on the narrative poem, The Tragicall History of Romeus and Juliet by Arthur Brooke is a story of two lovers, as the prologue famously refers to as "A pair of star-cross'd lovers", who were secretly married and suddenly separated throughout their "fearful passage of their death-mark'd love". The Globe Theatre was, like many others such as the Rose, the Swan and the Fortune a permanent playhouse built in London in the Elizabethan times. In 1596 James Burbage, a carpenter by trade, who owned the Theatre and the Curtain Theatre ran into difficulties when he tried to renew the ground lease of the Theatre. Negotiations yielded no viable solution, and James died, leaving his son Cuthbert to resolve the problem. The latter acted with daring and imagination. ...read more.

Middle

Noisy effects such as drumming, fireworks and trumpet blasts were scaled down in the indoor theatres however, song and music were much more features of the newer theatres, as they were of plays staged in private halls. All the spectators were seated, nevertheless members of the audience would probably rise from their seats in times of high excitement on the stage, such as swordfights or more conceivably in times of disgust if they disapproved of the actors and would rise from their seats to hurl things at the actors or boo and hiss. Only seven hundred spectators could be accommodated in the Blackfriars theatre compared to what was between two and three thousand spectators being able to be accommodated in the Globe. This large audience could have created a very vibrant and exciting atmosphere when required for at a specific point in the play, such as these swordfights in this scene, act3 scene1. Finally, the body language, facial expressions and speed and pace of speech would be essential in this scene. For example, as it is a fighting scene the body language and facial expressions of the characters would emphasize the characters feelings towards each other for the audience to receive and react too and also more importantly, in times of no dialogue inform the audience who is fighting who and even create audience anticipation as they judge the characters body language and facial expressions and in turn anticipate what they will do next. Moreover, the speed and pace in which the speech is delivered to the audience would be important as it would coincide with the other factors previously mentioned such as the sound effects and the audience participation. For example, as the characters begin to swordfight the tone and pace of the music and the accompaniment of the audience could increase. Therefore, as a result the speed and pace in which the speech is delivered by the characters would have to increase simultaneously to retain and furthermore add to the feeling emphasized by the drama, and also to retain the spectators interest, anticipation and participation. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, I believe this climatic, emotional and moving scene in which rounds off the story of Romeo and Juliet is the best way of concluding the story because it is a fitting and convincing ending to what the impassioned and ironic story of Romeo and Juliet builds up to. Over all I believe act5 scene3 is the most dramatic and touching scene in the story of Romeo and Juliet and I think it would definitely come across as one of the finest and most dramatic scenes out of the whole play when performed at not only the Globe Theatre but other theatres past and present. The scene is one in which I believe is in a sense the most satisfying, convincing and most definitely the most touching and in turn dramatic scene in the whole story and is perfectly rounded off with the fitting, emotional and eternal line spoken by Prince Escalus: For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo The Globe Theatre was a 17th-century English theater in Southwark, London, notable for the initial and contemporaneous productions of the dramatic works of English writers William Shakespeare, Ben Johnson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and others. The Globe was constructed in 1599 by English actor Richard Burbage in partnership with Shakespeare and others. The octagonal shaped outer wall of the theater enclosed a roofless inner pit into which the stage projected. Around the pit were three galleries (balconies) one above the other, the topmost of which was roofed with thatch. In 1613 a cannon, discharged during a performance of Shakespeare's Henry VIII, set fire to the thatched roof and destroyed the building. The theater was rebuilt in 1614 but 30 years later was destroyed by the Puritans. In 1970 American actor and director Sam Wanamaker began raising funds to rebuild the Globe, and in 1996 the new theater, based on the design of the original structure, was opened. 1 12 ...read more.

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