• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Romeo and Juliette: Who is to blame for the star-crossed lovers tragic death?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Romeo and Juliette: Who is to blame for the star-crossed lovers tragic death? The death of Romeo and Juliet were partly due to the star-crossed lovers lack of careful consideration and planning. The first day they met and the next they got married. Juliet knew she was betrothed to Paris yet she married in haste. Maybe if they had been older they would have realised that their 'happily ever after' was inconceivable. Therefore we have established that the young lovers were mainly responsible for their untimely death because their fate was in their own hands. However there were others who assisted them in their romance namely the nurse and Friar Lawrence, and the parents who were also responsible because they did not listen to the wishes of their offspring and many other characters were pivotal in actions, which led the couple to their grave. The nurse was in someway responsible for Romeo and Juliet's death, but not intentionally. She only wanted what was best for Juliet and wanted her "lamb" to be happy. She is more of a mother figure to her mistress than Lady Capulet, who has a very strained relationship with her daughter. This maternal love that the nurse has for Juliet, we assume is to make up for the loss of her own daughter, Susan, who died at a young age "Susan is with god". ...read more.

Middle

This yearning may have been the reason her eagerness to marry Romeo which lead to their untimely death, thus being partly the nurse's fault. However, for all the nurses scheming, she seems to think that Romeo and Juliet's romance is just a teenage crush that would not last. When Juliet's parents state that Juliet was to marry Paris Juliet turns to her Nurse asking for her advice "Comfort me, counsel me". But the latter contrary to Juliet's expectations, agrees with her parents, saying that she should forget Romeo now that he was forever exiled to Mantua, and marry Paris "best you married with the County. O, he's a lovely gentleman!" When Juliet feigns to agree with her "thou hast comforted me marvellous much" the Nurse is very pleased "this is wisely done". But Juliet in fact feels betrayed by the nurse who had supported her all along "O. most wicked fiend". This betrayal persuades Juliet to seek help from Friar Lawrence. As the nurse is Juliet's confidante, Friar Lawrence is Romeo's counsellor. Friar Lawrence is it seems very close to Romeo, as he knows about Rosaline "wast thou with Rosaline" and probably about Romeo's past heartaches. Also Romeo goes straight to him in the morning to confide in him his new found love for Juliet "the fair daughter of rich Capulet". ...read more.

Conclusion

This forces the lovers connection to be illicit even before it starts, resulting in misunderstanding and then death. Many other people were responsible for their death but without being strongly connected with it. Mercutio convinced Romeo to go to the Capulet's party where he met Juliet and fell in love with her " we must have you dance". Furthermore Mercutio provoked Tybalt who killed him and in turn was killed by Romeo who was then exiled, which I have already proved led to his death. Consequently both Mercutio and Tybalt are indirectly responsible for the lover's death. The Prince is also responsible for exiling Romeo although he was just acting as the law commended " Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill". Therefore it is not only one person responsible for Romeo and Juliet's death, but a series of events all leading up to this tragic end. Nobody was directly or purposefully responsible for the infatuated pair apart from themselves. The Nurse and Friar Lawrence both acted out of the goodness of their heart even if their actions were sometimes rash and na�ve. The family feud was the main storyline and it must be said that without it the lovers could have been betrothed, but would they have loved each other with as much passion as when they were acting illicitly? In some ways the moment Romeo and Juliet fell in love, their untimely death became their fate. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. 'To what extent does act one of 'Romeo and Juliet' influence the events in ...

    This is because of Tybalt's obsessive hatred of the Montagues and his aggressive nature. ("Romeo, the love I bear thee can afford no better term than this-thou art a villain"). After they fight again and Tybalt and Mercutio end up dead.

  2. Romeo and Juliet - Who is to blame for the death of the star ...

    In the balcony scene he risks getting caught by the Nurse, and then later in Juliet's bedroom when Lady Capulet is looking for her. Romeo doesn't seem to be a reliable lover, as he should not have killed Tybalt in such haste.

  1. Who is the most to blame for the tragic deaths of Romeo and Juliet?

    Romeo's impulsiveness also combined with his feeling of grief when he heard from Balthasar that Juliet was dead caused him to rush to Verona to see the sight for himself. he never considered what would happen when he entered Verona, as he was already banished from there for slaying Tybalt.

  2. The chorus refers to Romeo and Juliet as "star-crossed lovers". Do you agree with ...

    He decides to chase Tybalt and slay him, this is a very unintelligent decision. It does no bring back his friend, it threatens his life and his marriage, banishment should be considered as lucky. "This but begins the woe others must end."

  1. How far do you think Friar Lawrence is to Blame for the Tragic Events ...

    He is thinking of what a mess he has made of this great plan he had to join the two families. It is this plan that really makes him responsible for the tragedy at the end of the play; this is because he is scared of the consequences of what might happen to him if he tells the truth.

  2. 'Who is to blame for the death of Romeo and Juliet? Discuss.'

    His emotions overcome him and he kills Tybalt, a disastrous action, which results in his banishment. He tries to avoid getting into a fight with Tybalt, proving that he is a powerful, yet resistive character, 'Doth much excuse the appertaining rage to such a greeting'.

  1. Romeo and Juliet 'the star-crossed lovers' are doomed from the start, not by fate ...

    'He shall not make me there a joyful bride,' she recalls. Capulet then tells her 'graze where you will, you shall to house with me!' This shows Capulets quick change in nature for at the beginning of the play he is so kind.

  2. Who is to blame for the tragic death of Romeo and Juliet, The Nurse ...

    from her father and she does not hide behind her mother which shows that she feels more safe with the nurse and not her mother and this also gives us an idea of how strong the relationship between the nurse and Juliet are.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work