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Romeo: is He in Control of His Destiny or is it Fate?

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Introduction

Nicholas Tessitore Tuesday, March 25, 2003 English - Honors - Essay Mrs. Antoinette Romeo: is He in Control of His Destiny or is it Fate? In the play Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare after Romeo kills Tybalt, he exclaims, "Oh, I am fortune's fool," as various decisions have altered Romeo's life. However, Romeo contradicts himself, as he is not "fortune's fool," because Romeo was really in control of his own destiny. Through the use of literary devices, Shakespeare is able to portray how Romeo and Juliet were not "star-crossed lover," yet in fact they were in control of their own destiny. Clearly, "Wisely and slowly. They stumble that run fast," is good advice, but no matter how good advice is, if it is not take, it's worthless. These words were the wise words of Friar Lawrence, who advised Romeo and Juliet to let love take its course, as they were progressing too hastily in their relationship. ...read more.

Middle

Romeo led to his own demise, as he was in control of his destiny. When Romeo first met Juliet he did not have to "let lips do what hands do" and kiss Juliet, thus marking the beginning of their relationship. Symbolically, this also marks the beginning of the end for Romeo, as was his choice. Also, another factor that Romeo was in control of is whether or not their relationship should be public or private, foolishly he decided it to be private, yet further complicating things. Since their relationship was private, a vast majority knew none of it, but to make matters worse, Romeo and Juliet were of two "feuding families" holding "an ancient grudge" against one another. Romeo stated however, he "would write his name and tear it," if it would so please Juliet. From this, ironically, many of Romeo's decisions seemed impotent, as he could have been with Juliet, as names meant no difference to either of them. ...read more.

Conclusion

Mercutio, now dead, Romeo becomes enraged and "gallops apace" to Tybalt, where in which he duels and kills him. Ironically, Romeo now sealed his own fate, as he was now "banished" from Verona Streets, and since there is "no world outside Verona Walls," he is going to commit suicide and metaphorically "death shall suck the honey of thy [Romeo's] breath." Clearly from this, Romeo has been in control of his destiny, as he has chosen how his life shall be lived, and what decisions he shall make. A "pair of star-crossed lovers take their lives," thus there "never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo." In truth, Romeo and Juliet were not "star-crossed lovers," as Romeo was in full control of his destiny at all times. Through the use of literary devices, Shakespeare is able to portray how Romeo was in control of his fate. As Romeo has seen, irrational decisions can lead to uncontrollable consequences and undesirable effects, and in return one could end up in a position "past hope, past care, past help." ...read more.

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