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Say why Anthony,cassius and ceasar are not noble.

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Introduction

Check tenses Say why Anthony,cassius and ceasar are not noble Check flow +250 words Julius Caesar Question: Is Brutus the Noblest Roman of them all? Throughout the play "Julius Caesar" it could be argued that many characters show signs of being noble. Brutus however, the dramatic focus of the play is described by Anthony as "the noblest roman of them all." Why does Anthony say this and is this true? From Act 1 scenes 2 and 3 we learn most about the character of Brutus "I love... the name of honour more than I fear death." Cassius then responds with "I know that virtue to be in you Brutus" this emphasises to the reader from the start that Brutus is perceived to be honourable. Brutus is portrayed as a man who is widely respected in society with a social conscience. From the start of the play we see Brutus set aside from the rest of the conspirators, he is at an objective viewer unlike the other conspirators like Cassius who is motivated by envy, revenge and self interest. ...read more.

Middle

Stating that he would rather be a peasant than a Roman Citizen under the present oppressive regime shows that Brutus puts common good before personal feelings has a social conscience and genuinely fears for the people. "What means this shouting? I do fear the people have chosen Caesar for their King" This to me shows him to be honourable and noble. Others such as Cassius had other motives and were frightened of losing control of the Senate that their families had held for generations. After finally deciding to join the conspirators Brutus refuses to swear on an oath "No not an oath" he goes on to say, "What need we any spur but our own cause." Brutus here illustrates his moral principles and how he felt bound by trust alone. Another notable example of Brutus' nobility occurs during the first meeting of the conspirators. "O, he sits high in all people's hearts," says Casca. In act 2 scene 1 Brutus delivers a long soliloquy in which he debates the rights and wrongs of killing Caesar. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Farewell, good strats, Caesar, now be still; I kill'd not thee with half so good a will." Brutus recognised the justice of his death and accepted it as he had lived nobly. The Romans regarded suicide as noble. With all of Brutus' characteristics I believe that he became the tragic hero of the play. I think Anthony summed up Brutus well at the end "This was the noblest roman of all. All the conspirators save only he Did that they did in envy of great Caesar; He only in general honest thought And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle, and the elements So mixed in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, "this was a man." In conclusion I do believe that Brutus was the noblest Roman of them all I think the servant speaking in act 3 scene 1 described Brutus perfectly "Brutus is noble, wise, valiant and honest." However although he was noble and had the very best of intentions he was ultimately na�ve and too trusting. His realism overcame his reason and he paid the price for it. ...read more.

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