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Shakespeare's use of imagery in 'Macbeth'

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Introduction

Shakespeare's use of imagery in 'Macbeth' Shakespeare has used lots of imagery in his plays to make the audience think from a certain point of view, e.g. to create a certain mood, feeling or impression. In Macbeth the main imageries Shakespeare used were weather, location, time, blood, clothing and light and darkness. To create the mood of evil and darkness in Act 1, Scene 1, the Weather in which the Witches always meet in is dangerous and scary, "When shall we, three meet again In thunder, lightning, or in rain?" (Act 1, Scene 1, Line 1). The audience also gets the feeling of the supernatural being present because if you wanted to meet someone you don't usually plan it to be on a stormy day, "There to meet with Macbeth." (Act 1, Scene 1, Line 7). Shakespeare used the image of bad weather to create a feeling in peoples minds that something bad is going to happen. In Julius Caesar the weather turning bad is an indication that an evil crime is about to occur, "Are not you mov'd, when all the sway of earth Shakes like a thing unfirm? ...read more.

Middle

It is very strange for someone normal to meet here, again this gives us the feeling of evil and danger. Also the Location where King Duncan was murdered was at his own castle makes the murderous event more sinister and the play more interesting and suspenseful. People in the play start to think the King's own sons, might have committed the murder "They were suborn'd Malcolm and Donalbain, the king's two sons, Are stol'n away and fled, which puts upon them Suspicion of the deed."(Act 2, Scene 4, Line 24). This is also similar to Julius Caesar who was also killed on his own territory, the Senate House, "Caesar, all hail! Good morrow, worthy Caesar: I come to fetch you to the Senate House." (Act 2, Scene 2, Line 58). In Act 5 Scene 1 Lady Macbeth suffered from guilt in the same castle where King Duncan was killed. This adds to the mystery of why Lady Macbeth went insane for example it could be something like the ghost of King Duncan which was disturbing her mind. ...read more.

Conclusion

(Act 5, Scene 1, Line 41). Shakespeare used blood as a substitution for braveness as well, "What bloody man is that?" (Act 1, Scene 2), Here King Duncan is referring to a sergeant who has fought well he uses the imagery of blood because if you are brave in a battle you probably fought courageously and spilled a lot of blood. Shakespeare used images of Darkness in many plays but it plays a vital role in Macbeth for example, the vision of the dagger that Macbeth saw was at night, "Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee:" (Act 2, Scene 1, Line 32). The murder of Duncan and Banquo was at night, "Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck, Till thou applaud the deed. Come, seeing night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day, And with thy bloody and invisible hand" (Act 3, Scene 2, Line 45). In this quote Shakespeare uses the imagery of Darkness and Blood. Use of imagery like this made the play much more powerful and enjoyable making Shakespeare one of the most skilful play writers in the History of English language. Mohammed Umar Page 1 of 3 ...read more.

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This writer has made some good points and has referred to the text in detail at times. They needed to explore language more often and to focus more on the question.

Marked by teacher Paul Dutton 20/03/2013

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