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She's Come Undone: Self Discovery

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Jamie Piacenza Honors English 3 September 3, 2009 She's Come Undone: Self Discovery She's Come Undone by Wally Lamb emphasizes how important self-discovery is in any person's life. The main character, Dolores Price, is one who needs to find her true self. The epiphanies she has truly help Dolores to discover that person. The breaking points that she reaches and the people she meets along her journey to self-discovery help make Dolores stronger, as well as smarter. The most important of those epiphanies is the time during which Dolores realizes that all of her failed relationships, such as the ones with her mother, father, Dante, and grandmother, are not only her fault. It takes two people to have a relationship, no matter whom it is with. She comes to love herself a little more, and blame herself a little less. Dolores also has a "subconscious" epiphany when she makes a phone call to her mother's childhood best friend, Geneva, during a suicide attempt. ...read more.


Dr. Shaw gives Dolores the chance to do something that no one ever did and that is the chance to express herself, which she does through etch-n-sketch drawings. However, Dolores leaves Dr. Shaw a little bit prematurely, and begins to care for herself in the real world, starting with buying an apartment. The real world is a big shocker for Dolores. She is living alone, paying her own bills, and having to find her own job. She moves across from Dante, an ex-boyfriend of her college roommate. Once introduced, the two begin an intimate relationship, but Dolores complicates things for herself by creating a fictional life story. She lives a lie for Dante because she does not want to fail him either, and she even aborts their baby. However, Dante proves to be the failure in the relationship when he cheats on Dolores with a student of his. This proves to be an epiphany for Dolores also. ...read more.


No one knows who they really are until you find something that is worth living for; something that keeps you going each morning. No matter who you are, you reach your breaking points. You have mental breakdowns and blocks that can hurt you, but in the end they only make you a stronger and better person. Dolores deals with the loss of a childhood, a non-existent grandmother, obesity, therapy, a suicide attempt, a hard relationship, and most importantly, a rape by someone she trusted. However, although she feels like she wants to quit life several times, it is worth it to stay here in the end. She discovers herself and merges into a life of happiness, security, and love. She allows herself to be given to a person fully and honestly. She now knows who she is better than anyone. The ending of the book truly captures the deepest message: ""Undone," I write in the journal - stare at the word, turn it over. Jack Speight undid me, then I almost undid myself. But I've undone some of the bad, too, some of the damage. With help. With luck and love..." (463) ...read more.

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