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Should Commercial Enterprises Close For Prayers? Saudi Arabian law says that commercial enterprises must close daily during prayer times to ensure that all Muslims pray. That would be five times a day and 30 minutes for each prayer. But instead of praying

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Introduction

Should Commercial Enterprises Close For Prayers If you think that waiting for a long time to buy something is bothersome, think again. On my way to the cash register, I found a huge line awaiting me. It took me 20 minutes to become second. Then when it was my turn, the salesperson said, "It's time to close." He wouldn't even let me purchase the coat. "Why?" I asked. "Because of Prayers!" I was frustrated. I've been waiting for the past 30 minutes and he expects me to come back after the store opens. Why can't he just take the money and let me be. He says, "Because it's against the law. And we are in Saudi Arabia." Saudi Arabian law says that commercial enterprises must close daily during prayer times to ensure that all Muslims pray. That would be five times a day and 30 minutes for each prayer. But instead of praying, some people end up waiting in the car next to a store. ...read more.

Middle

ordered the closing of businesses during the prayer." The Quran also declares, "When the call to prayer is made on the day of congregation (a Salat al-Jumu'ah- Friday prayers), hurry towards the reminder of Allah and leave off your trading." This means that the stores should close only during the Friday prayers. It is because Friday is considered by Muslims as a blessed day during which the faithful must abstain from all sins and multiply good deeds. This is why Friday's collective prayer is the most important service of the week for Muslims. But nothing in the Quran mentions that stores should close at every prayer. Therefore, this law is useless. The closing of businesses in Saudi Arabia, with its huge economic activities, cannot be justified by the Sharia (Islamic Law). According to Dr. Abdul Aziz Dakhil, "The four daily breaks for prayer translate into a loss of four hours of work per day," making newspapers and websites fall behind Al Hayat. He stresses that the repeated shutting down of commercial companies are affecting productivity and retailers. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, the salespeople should have shifts. When it is time to pray the Muslims can leave and the non-Muslims can take care of the store. If there are only Muslims in one store then they would switch giving enough time for each person to pray. Or if the government is set on this law, then the times of closure should be reduced. It does not take 30 minutes to pray. Also, some shops close for 20 minutes while others for 45 so there should be an exact time frame. I personally like abandoning this law because it is fairer to non-Muslims. If there is anything I learned, it is that people cannot impose religious acts. God would not reward any act if it is not that person's true desire. At the same time the country should respect people's rights in terms of religious practices. The practices are imposed on the society to the degree that it is part of the routine and, at the same time, non-Muslims are not allowed to have their own worshiping places. Everyone is entitled to their own practices and no law should restrict that. ...read more.

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