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Show how Cathy's desire for social status changes her personality throughout her life and to what extent her social position is responsible for the misery and conflict in Chapter 9 of Wuthering Heights.

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Introduction

Show how Cathy's desire for social status changes her personality throughout her life and to what extent her social position is responsible for the misery and conflict in Chapter 9 of Wuthering Heights. Cathy's personality changes throughout her life, mainly due to social status. Her social position causes misery and conflict especially when she decides to marry Edgar. The author, Emily Bront�, wrote the main body of the novel as: Heathcliff is bought up into the Earnshaw family, a family who are not poor but do not act posh. There social status is not as high as Cathy desires, the Earnshaw daughter, Cathy, falls in love with Heathcliff, a scruffy gypsy boy of a lower status than them as he is an orphan. He has influenced Cathy to be boyish and scruffy like himself. When Cathy meets Edgar it is in quite unromantic settings but gradually they agree to marry despite her love for Heathcliff. Cathy believes that Edgar can better her as around him she is lady-like and posh, she believes it will be better marrying Edgar as he has a high social position, is rich and is handsome (everything she desires), ''Why do you love him Miss Cathy?'... 'Because he loves me.'' ...read more.

Middle

In Chapter 9 Bront�'s language suggests the elemental quality of their love and shows how clearly she understands her own feelings, 'My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods. Time will change it, I'm well aware, as winter changes the trees- my love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath- a source of little visible delight, but necessary.' Bront� also refers to elements in her writing when she shows the reader that the Earnshaw family are like storm and the Linton's are calm, therefore Cathy has a strong personality with a bad temper which is reflected by her actions throughout her novel, her stormy personality suggests a reason for a lot of the misery in 'wuthering heights' (e.g. in chapter 9 when she looked for Heathcliff outside in the rain all night because he overheard her criticize him). Emily Bront� uses language techniques like the change of narrator, each narrator has a different way of telling things, Nelly is always very exaggerated in what she says and includes her opinions a lot, this is so the story is presented directly to the reader so that it is presented to the reader as a drama. There are eight narrators through the book: Ellen Dean, Lockwood, Heathcliff, Catherine, Zillah, Linton, Cathy and Isabella. ...read more.

Conclusion

It's only after Cathy and Edgar get married that she has a high social position but her social position doesn't change as drastically as her personality. Her social position is responsible. Cathy's personality change causes a lot of misery within 'wuthering heights'. It not only affects the relationships with Cathy but with relationships between other people, for example: Heathcliff and Edgar resent each other and Heathcliff and Isabella got married because he was on the rebound. In conclusion, Cathy's desire for social status plays a big part of her personality changes and her choice for social position is responsible for the misery and conflict within the novel but best showed to the reader in Chapter 9. It is clear that Cathy truly loves Heathcliff, 'I am Heathcliff', and tries to trick herself into thinking that it is best to marry Edgar and would help Heathcliff when in fact she is just fulfilling her own desires. Cathy's true personality is the one she grew up with: spoilt and greedy. This has effected her decisions and other peoples. Her spoilt personality has contributed to her death as she starved herself because she was greedy for love and couldn't get her own way. Her death also contributed to Heathcliff's extremely bitter character therefore to Linton Heathcliff's death. Overall Cathy's personality has caused a lot of misery and conflict within the novel even after she died. Amy-Jane Sutheran 10A ...read more.

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