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Show how Sheila is the only charater who knows what the Inspector is doing.

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Introduction

English Work - Show how Sheila is the only charater who knows what the Inspector is doing. Notes: Sheila pg 27 "you see...(...)... tell you?" pg 28 "be careful" pg 29 "I don't understand bout you" pg 29 "no mother please" Ms Birling pg 29 "I'm mrs Birling" pg 30 "we all started like that" pg 30 "mother please don't" pg 30 "you mustn't try" pg 33 "no he's giving us the rope" pg 37 "somehow he makes you" Birling pg 37 "I must protest" Mrs Birling pg 41 "No. Why should I?" Mrs Birling pg 43 "I'm very sorry" pg 48 "mother stop" In the play Inspector Calls the inspector's actions change only mildly throughout the three existent acts. In act 2, the act in question, it becomes evident that Sheila has successfully caught onto the Inspectors mentality and "methods of inquiry" as he so calls it, and thus realises how the Inspector Goole is capable of obtaining all the information. ...read more.

Middle

If you do, then the inspector will just break it down. And it'll be all the worse when he does". However, she proceeds to saying in a figurative manner, "No, he's giving us the rope so that we will all hang ourselves" - which shows that the inspector tells them, or shows them enough evidence to make them feel even a remote amount of remorse, which is sufficient to trigger off an alert to more hidden knowledge. This is visible when he shows a picture, or mentions Daisy Rentons name to Gerald, and his reaction, even if he did try to cover it up, was undeniable. This led to his confessions at a later point in time, which "hung" himself for he claimed guilty. It was the case with every character, except Mr Birling who shows very little guilt if none at all, and throughout all of act one and two he insists that he acted righteously and he doesn't regret it the least bit. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is a conflict in ideas, for how can she feel sorrow if she blames the girl, or Eva Smith for everything? Besides it was Mrs. Birling who denied her help, help to protection and health, a right existent in the Human Rights. Therefore I can conclude that Sheila shows more guilt, remorse, compassion and sorrow towards the girl Eva Smith than any other character, and it is these feelings that gain her the compassion of the Inspector. At the same time, it could almost be said that they have a sort of link between each other, for the same way he understands her to an extent, she understands his ways of inquiry and the reasons behind these, and tries desperately to alert her family to this to avoid them digging themselves a deeper hole, however they simply don't choose to listen. There is clear evidence present in the text in Act 2 to support my statements regarding Sheila and her views of the inspector, and despite the fact that only a mere few were mentioned, she repeats the idea behind these various times. Jason Vincent ...read more.

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