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Show how the sense of order on the island deteriorates over the course of "Lord of the Flies".

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Introduction

´╗┐Show how the sense of order on the island deteriorates over the course of the novel ? Essay William Golding wanted to explore the fragility of our civilisation as he believed that adventure stories like ?The Coral Island? were unrealistic in their optimistic view of how young boys would act without adult supervision or rules. He wanted to write an adventure story that showed more accurately how children would behave without rules. So, in ?Lord of the Flies?, he abandons a group of schoolboys on a desert island and chronicles the battle between order and chaos that follows. The sense of order is one of the main themes in the novel and Golding creates the island as a microcosm of the outside world. In the novel, various symbols are used to represent the establishment and the gradual fall of law and order on the island. The most important symbols are Piggy, Piggy?s glasses and the conch. The deterioration of the sense of order on the island is not caused by a single event, but is a step by step process that is marked by several milestones. At the beginning of the novel, the boys were conscious of the need of order in the society and attempted to establish law and order. ...read more.

Middle

They let the fire go out as Jack had devised a new strategy which involved having his hunters form a circle into which a pig could be driven and beaten to death. In order to put his plan into action Jack decided that he also needed the two hunters who were on fire duty. As a result of this the fire went out, as there was nobody on duty to feed it with fuel. The real issue was not that Jack was thoughtless or negligent but that Jack thought only in terms of himself. Jack and the hunters get overwhelmed about their first kill and start to chant which shows their primitive rituals are beginning to replace useful rules. Ralph?s rage boils up and ?His voice was loud and savage, and struck them into silence? as he informed them all that ?There was a ship?. Piggy then speaks with assertiveness when he confronts Jack. In response, as Jack cannot challenge Ralph, he lashes out at Piggy ? Ralph?s brains ? instead, breaking his glasses. The ?unease of wrong-doing? that stops them hurting each other gradually wears off and the boys become more violent. As we know, the first violent act is when Jack hits Piggy. Piggy?s glasses are a symbol of order and represent reason and logic. ...read more.

Conclusion

In Chapter Eleven Roger, the least civilised character destroyed the conch ? the symbol of civilisation and order. The tribe lights a fire to smoke Ralph out. It sounds like a ?drum-roll? ? the same sound as the fire that killed the littluns. It hints that someone might die in this fire, too. The officer who rescues them wears a clean white uniform, but the world he represents is at war, just like the boys. Like Ralph, the reader realises that civilised appearances hide the ?darkness of man?s heart?. The officer?s gun and the warship are reminders that there?s a savage war going on in the grown-up world. At first, the boys try to replicate the orderly environment they have come from. Due to their inexperience and their malevolent spirit of Jack, their efforts are disjointed and unproductive. The group divides into the civilised boys and the savage boys, who subvert order wherever they find it. In the end, they are prepared to kill Ralph ? a figurehead of order ? and only the intervention of the naval officer averts a complete collapse of order. Neither civilisation nor barbarity wins at the end of the novel. The savages don?t kill Ralph, but the boys go back to a world of war understanding the nature of man?s innocence. Ralph bursts into tears ? he?s been rescued, but he?s lost his innocence. He realises that there is evil in everyone and it?s only held back by the rules of society. ...read more.

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