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Silas marner Character Analysis Essay

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Introduction

Paul Walmsley, 10B 29th January 2008 Analysis of Silas Marner's character Silas Marner's character develops throughout the novel, and passes through several different stages. The first sign we see of Silas' character is that he has a delicate personality, and this characteristic is demonstrated after he has been accused of the theft of a bag of money, in chapter one. He is tried, and found guilty by the unfair jury that is drawing lots. He is disregarded by his church, and will only be accepted back into the community upon his confession and repentance of this sin: "The lots declared that Silas Marner was guilty... There is no God that governs the earth righteously, But a God of lies, who bears witness against the innocent." This quotation, taken from page 61 shows that Silas' faith and trust in God has been severely tested, to the brink of destruction. ...read more.

Middle

Instead, he comforts himself by hoarding almost all of the profits from his weaving business, and using this money as his only companionship in life, which replaces human contact. In Lantern Yard, he was engaged to be married, but due to the aforementioned unfortunate circumstances, the wedding was cancelled, and his fianc´┐Że left him for another man. This money replaces her, regardless of its inanimate value, as his companion: "His gold, as he hung over it and saw it grow, gathered his power of loving together into a hard isolation like its own." This extract from page 92 demonstrates the probably fake love he feels for the gold. It cannot replace the feeling of true companionship and love that two humans can feel for each other, but as Silas has chosen to hide away, this is a replacement, and he begins to change the way he feels because he has no other option. ...read more.

Conclusion

He admits to both himself and the rest of the community that he has nothing else, and so they allow Silas to keep the girl, whom he later names Eppie. Silas Marner goes through many stages of personality change during the novel, be they for better or worse, but finally he ends up happy, with a daughter to raise, educate and socialise, and who can support him in later life. He no longer feels any need for the money, and also raising Eppie brings him into closer contact with the community, because he requires some help from good people like Dolly Winthrop, and also because he has a reason to socialise with them, like going to church, and to village gatherings. This unity is also demonstrated with a change in attitude of the villagers. They realise that Silas is no longer a miser, but is a kind and considerate, good father. They become sure of their feelings towards him, and he feels greater acceptance in the community. ...read more.

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