• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Silas Marner is the story of a lost soul who finds redemption." Explain how this comment might apply to George Eliot's novel.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Silas Marner is the story of a lost soul who finds redemption." Explain how this comment might apply to George Eliot's novel. The story of Silas Marner is focused on following the life of Silas Marner, the lonely weaver, and tracking the various events which befall him. This story was set in the 19th Century, and so as a result, the revolutionary scientific ideas which have shaped the world today had not yet set into society, especially not in the rural areas in which the story of Silas Marner's life takes place. Therefore, religious ideals are what binds the community together, and this faith in religion is what makes Silas a part of the community in the beginning of his story at Lantern Yard. However, when he is framed and judged guilty over murdering the senior deacon of the church for his money, he is not only cast out of the social community, but also he loses his faith in religion. Silas Marner may be called a "lost soul" due to the fact that prior to his loss of faith, the only thing he had in his life was the church and his faith, i.e. ...read more.

Middle

George Eliot asks the reader a rhetorical question "Have not men, shut up in solitary imprisonment, found an interest in marking the moments by straight strokes of a certain length on the wall, until the growth of the sum of straight strokes, arranged in triangles, has become a mastering purpose?" The reference to solitary imprisonment refers to just how isolated Silas is from the Raveloe community; this quotation also comments on how Silas became addicted to money just as a man in prison becomes addicted to markings on walls; there was nothing else for Silas to do but to weave on his loom, and the money he collected from this practice was what satisfied his lack of purpose. However, it is in Silas' power to love that he finds redemption. From the story, one can deduce that Silas is a kind-hearted person, i.e. At the beginning of the story, he can see nothing but goodness in his friend William Dane, despite the obvious treachery on William's part. When Eppie, the child of Godfrey Cass (the son of the squire) and Molly Farren (who had recently died due to hypothermia) wandered into Silas' house during one of his cataleptic fits, the first thing he sees when he looks at the child ...read more.

Conclusion

However, when Godfrey Cass and Nancy, his wife, come to Silas' house to tell him that Eppie is in fact Godfrey's daughter and that he wants her back by birthright since Godfrey and Nancy cannot have children, Silas is deeply shocked, so Eppie herself defends Silas " Thank you ma'am - thank you, sir. But I can't leave my father, nor own anybody nearer than him." This shows how close Eppie is to Silas, because she would rather stay with Silas than live with her real father and be the daughter of the Squire. We can see now that Silas has at last found redemption in the love of Eppie, a love which his golden guineas could not provide; for through his love for Eppie, Silas finally establishes links with the rest of his community, e.g. when he goes to find clothing for Eppie as a baby, he asks Dolly Winthrop and gives her half a guinea, but instead, she says "There's no call to buy, no more nor a pair o' shoes; for I've got the little petticoats as Aaron wore five years ago..." Already, Dolly has offered Silas the clothes that her son Aaron wore when he was a baby instead of him paying for them. This is an example of Silas forging social links with the rest of Raveloe. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE George Eliot section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE George Eliot essays

  1. Contrast And Compare The Three Fathers In Silas Marner. What Does This Examination Of ...

    be moved from them after his anger subsided-as fiery volcanic matter cools and hardens into rock." We can believe that this comment is correct, as in times of anger, se wee the Squire in a dislikeable temper. There is one point at which this becomes extremely clear to us.

  2. Describe how the character of Silas Marner is presented in the novel and explain ...

    money as soon as he sees her he falls in love with her. When he adopts her as his own all the villagers forget everything they have thought of Marner in the passed and start forging new relationships with him.

  1. Silas Marner is a study of alienation and redemption, show how this is true, ...

    One day after the New Year had began Silas had been out for a walk, he came back to his cottage and he fell into one of his cataleptic fit whilst standing at his door. He awoke with blurry eyes and saw gold locks on the floor, at first he

  2. Trace the character of Silas Marner throughout the novel and explain the ideas that ...

    Silas has firmly decided, "the child has come to me" "I've a right to keep it." This is another big distinction between the characters of Silas and Godfrey; how good a father they each are. Whereas Godfrey wanted little to do with the child; he constantly gave Molly money to

  1. Discuss The Importance of Loneliness in the Novel Silas Marner by George Eliot

    Silas' entrance during the conversation about ghosts, adds to his eeriness around the village. The talking quickly stops as the man stare at the unexpected small, pale figure before them. For a moment Silas appears to be angry, when confronting Jem Rodney about the theft, but soon returns to his

  2. What does the novel Silas Marner have to say about the relationship between parents ...

    "It's me she's been calling her father ever since she could say the word", meaning that even though they are not naturally related and at first felt upset, a sense of anger is coming through his words showing that he feels annoyed that Godfrey had let his love grow for

  1. Novelists in the nineteenth century believed not only in entertaining their readers, but also ...

    God that governs the earth righteously, but a God of lies that bears witness against the innocent.. Ultimately William had succeeded in blackening the name of Silas Marner, as a result of which Silas' fianc�e broke off their engagement and later married Dane.

  2. The Gift of Children in "Silas Marner". What does the novel have to say ...

    children or take responsibility for anything ? as long as you have financial security your family will be perfect in everybody else?s eyes. His wife died a long time ago, and she was the one who was ?the fountain of wholesome love?, whereas Squire Cass seems to lose interest in them very quickly.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work