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Silas Marner was a skilled handloom linen-weaver, of simple life who had come to live in the village of Raveloe.

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Introduction

Silas Marner Silas Marner was a skilled handloom linen-weaver, of simple life who had come to live in the village of Raveloe. The sound of his loom was very different from anything the villagers were used to and the village boys would stare in at his window until he chased them away: Silas�s Loom, so unlike the natural cheerful trotting of the winnowing-machine, or the simpler rhythm of the flail, had a half-fearful fascination for the Raveloe boys, who would often leave their nutting or bird�s- 'nesting to peep in at the window of the stone cottage, counter balancing a certain awe at the mysterious action of the loom, by a pleasant sense of scornful superiority, drawn from the mockery of its alternating noises along with the bent, thread-mill attitude of the weaver'. The boys of the village were afraid that Silas had an 'evil eye' and that he could harm them by just looking at them. There was a belief that he had some sort of connection with the devil because of his healing powers. When Silas came to Raveloe he did not make any new friends preferring to keep himself busy by just doing his work. The reason for this was because in Lantern Yard he had been betrayed by his 'friend�, William Dane, who had accused him of theft resulting in the lost of his beloved Sarah and his expulsion from the chapel. ...read more.

Middle

Eppie became Silas�s 'new treasure� which was to become far more valuable to him than his lost gold. Eppie�s pleasure took him outside the house and out of himself. Long lost memories started to return and Eppie gave him a new life with Silas taking a lot of care of Eppie. He decided to bring up Eppie with love. Eppie also started going with Silas when he delivered his weaving. And when children started meeting with Eppie they were no longer afraid of weaver. Silas no longer hoarded his money but spent it on a proper purpose. The death of Eppie�s mother had a great effect on people�s lives. Silas insistence on keeping the child influenced the villager�s feelings in favour of him who saw it as some recompense for his stolen savings. Dolly started to help Silas a lot in bringing up the child. Dolly asked Silas to have the child christened and to bring her to church. Silas agreed although he did not know what that meant. He could not connect his past non-conformist beliefs with the established church of Dolly�s religion. But for the sake of Eppie agrees to set foot in a church for the first time in his life. Silas now has more contact with the villagers because of his church attendance, as well as with looking after Eppie�s needs. Silas started discussing with Dolly how to punish Eppie when she become naughty but he could not bear to do it. ...read more.

Conclusion

to me and I�ve come to love her as myself, I�ve had light enough to trusten by; and know she says she�ll never leave me, I think I shall trusten till I die.' The traditional time of year for weddings in Raveloe was Laburnum and Lilac time. Eppie�s wedding was in that season. She had often thought, though with certainty that she could never have a perfect wedding dress but Nancy provided for her. On the wedding day Godfrey was not in Raveloe for 'special reasons.� The village had accepted his kindness to Silas and Eppie an attempt to make up for the wrong his brother had done to the weaver in stealing his gold. Mr Macey explained how right he always had been about Silas, and the return of his money. The villagers while waiting for the feast consider the blessings that Silas had brought on himself by taking Eppie in. His patience had been rewarded; his gold restored, his daughter preferring him to her blood father and now Silas had son to help care for him in his retirement. The once outcast weaver was now a respected and well-loved family man: The garden was fenced with stones on two sides, but in front there was an open fence, through which the flowers shone with answering gladness, as the four united people came within sight of them. ' O father�, said Eppie, 'what a pretty home ours is! I think nobody could be happier than we are'. ...read more.

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