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Sir arthur conan doyle atmosphere in hound of the baskervilles

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Introduction

How Does Sir Arthur Conan Doyle create atmosphere in chapter 6? In "the Hound of the Baskervilles", Sir Arthur Conan Doyle describes the atmosphere in depth frequently; usually the atmosphere reflects the mood of the chapter. Also he cleverly uses the atmosphere to show a comparison between good and evil, for example in chapter 6, between the Devonshire Moors and Baskerville Hall. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle introduces atmosphere in key events throughout the book, this is used to provide suspense and set the tone. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle uses comparisons such as the lush countryside as opposed the gloomy moor to create an atmosphere and set the scene. As Sherlock Holmes, Dr Mortimer and Dr Watson travel through the county on the train the author describes the immediate changes. "Brown earth had become ruddy", this is used to show how the earth had become fresher and red. This also shows that the Devonshire countryside is a good/safe place. "Lush grasses...luxuriant vegetation" is used to describe the richness and the quality of the Devonshire land. It also creates an image that Devonshire is safe as shows no evil, unlike Baskerville Hall. "Lush" and "luxuriant" are very descriptive words, and show the reader that everything is all right and creates a good, calm atmosphere. As the reader can compare "lush grasses" to summer green fields, this sets a homely atmosphere. Young Baskerville shows the reader that the countryside is easy on the eyes, as it states, "Young Baskerville stared eagerly", and gives the impression that he is ecstatic to be there. ...read more.

Middle

As they enter the moor it states, "rotting vegetation-sad gifts", this can be compared to the countryside as they were pleased by the "luxurious vegetation" but now it is "rotting vegetation", this changes the atmosphere to old and dead. As they near the end of the moor they see a "dark and stern" soldier, this shows that the moor is not safe, as it has a soldier protecting it. When young Baskerville states, "convict escaped", it sets an uneasy atmosphere, as people are scared and worried. Also a convict escaped relates to the hound as two killers are on the loose. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle relates the Notting Hill murderer to our hound and uses various statements to describe him. "Brutality" and "assassin", they are both words the reader could associate with the hound who killed various people. The atmosphere changes to dangerous and dark. The atmosphere now reflects on the mood of young Baskerville and the scenery around the moor. The atmosphere should also change the reader's views as the lush green countryside was seen as peaceful whilst the moor is the opposite. As they grow close to Baskerville Hall the atmosphere gets darker as the author mentions a "darking sky", this sets the atmosphere for the rest of the chapter, as they do not turn back. "We looked back", this shows they wanted to go back to the countryside where they feel safe, but they venture on. This can also demonstrate that Sherlock Holmes may see the case as dangerous. ...read more.

Conclusion

As the atmosphere now is dark and gloomy, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle uses this to make the reader interested and read on. The reader needs to get to a safe place and is encouraged to read on hoping for a return to normality. In conclusion the general feeling toward Baskerville Hall is that it is evil, and this shows that evil deeds will befall the three passengers. As it states "difficult and dangerous", this leads us to believe that the curse will take a while to solve. "Dangerous" shows us that there will be consequences and the evil tone suggests it will involve the hound. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle uses atmosphere to show true feelings of the area where Sherlock Holmes is situated. In chapter two Mortimer presents Holmes and Watson with a manuscript which the always observant Sherlock Holmes had already noticed and dated as 1730. The document shows the curse of Baskerville Hall, and reveals the terror of Baskerville Hall expressed by the atmosphere in chapter six. "At the time of the "Great Revolution," Mortimer reads, Hugo Baskerville lorded over the Baskerville mansion in Devonshire. Sex crazed and lecherous, the infamous Hugo became obsessed with a local yeoman's daughter, whom he kidnapped one day. Trapped in an upstairs room, hearing the raucous drinking and carousing going on downstairs, the girl escaped with the help of an ivy-covered wall. She fled across the expansive moorlands outside. Enraged at finding that his captive escaped, Hugo made a deal with the devil and released his hounds in pursuit of the young girl." This explains to us why the curse was placed upon the family. By Laurence Jackson Laurence Jackson Page 1 of 4 ...read more.

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