• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Sixth Sense English Coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Through close analysis of the restaurant scene and the scene where Dr Crowe is in the house with both Cole and his mother, discuss the techniques used to make the audience believe that Dr Crowe is alive" In my analysis of the two selected scenes from 'The Sixth Sense' I am going to be discussing the many shrewd techniques that are used to disguise the concealed revelation exposed at the end of the film where both Dr Crowe and the audience discover that Dr Crowe is in fact dead. Dr Crowe acts as the therapist to troubled child Cole and throughout the film the two develop a close friendship as Dr Crowe attempts to understand and cure Cole. Dr Crowe has an almost peculiar fixation with Cole, isolating himself from his wife by letting his work take over his life. However, the audience begins to understand Dr Crowe's obsession with Cole as a correlation is established between Cole and a previous patient, Vincent, whom Dr Crowe could not help. A resentful Vincent finds Dr Crowe, full of anger, and shoots him on the night he receives a prestigious award for his work as a child psychologist. Despite the fact that Dr Crowe died when he was shot, the film implies that death needs closure and in Dr Crowe's case closure means curing Cole. ...read more.

Middle

The scene is masterfully created, integrating two different stories into one scene. The actors must be convincing before and after the audience know that Dr Crowe is dead. Therefore, their acting must be adaptable and believable in both scenes. The same applies to their motives and behaviour, each scene has to establish a way for the characters to behave and this is determined by their motive. For example, Cole's motive is to act as though he does not know that Dr Crowe is in the room, his behaviour in the first viewing must reflect this and he acts as though he does not want to talk to Dr Crowe because he does not want to admit he has a problem. On second viewing the motive affects his behaviour in different way; he does not acknowledge Dr Crowe because he does not want his mother to know that he can see ghosts. For the scene to work perfectly the motive must remain the same, this gives the scene a 'butterfly effect' quality, allowing it to be affected by the audience knowing whether Dr Crowe is dead or alive. The second scene that I am analyising is 'The Restaurant Scene' in which Dr Crowe meets his wife at a restaurant to celebrate their anniversary. The scene opens with an over-the-shoulder shot of Dr Crowe's wife, Anna, sat alone at a table for two, wearing a crimson dress. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, on a second viewing, the depth of Anna's sadness becomes more obvious. The audience mistakes Anna's heartbroken desire to relive the days when her husband was alive for anger at his late arrival to the restaurant. After having discussed and analyzed 'The Restaurant Scene' and 'The scene where Dr Crowe is in the house with both Cole and his mother' I feel as though I have begun to unravel the many layers to the Sixth Sense. Despite the fact that for near the entirety of the film the audience believes that it is a standard horror film, something rather more stunning is revealed when the audience discovers that Dr Crowe is dead. The perfection and plausibility of the film could never have been achieved without the technical and dramatic techniques that have been used throughout the whole film and particularly the two scenes I have studied. I don't think that I've ever accredited the enormous impact that the camera angles and the way that the set is assembled effect a scene; The Sixth Sense definitely provides an impeccable example of how successfully it can help to define a story. It is one of those rare films that maintains the ability to be watched more than once and feel as though you are watching an entirely different film. The film offers a balance of adept acting, shrewd scripting and astute camera shots that fool the audience into believing that Dr Crowe is alive. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Miscellaneous section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Miscellaneous essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Explain the relationship between Dysart and normality in Equus.

    3 star(s)

    Dysart uses 'plastic' to describe how the world is so used to its dystopian, man-made, manufactured world, 'he'll trot on his metal pony tamely through the concrete evening,' and 'his private parts will come to feel plastic to him...' Dysart loathes plainness and the syntheticism of life; he cannot escape

  2. Rabbit Proof Fence - Media Coursework

    The music gives a sense of accomplishment. The mothers are also aware of the children being close and an aboriginal ritual is taking place for the safe return of the girls.

  1. How Stevenson Uses Setting and Place in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and ...

    the cover of smog, whilst the clear weather allows someone to witness the ghastly deed. The description of the houses leads us to the conclusion that this is a more wealthy area such as the West End, a place not frequented by the working classes unless it was for work purposes.

  2. Film Techniques in Pleasantville

    Those two texts both taught us about that knowledge is not a thing that everyone can choose to know about in a utopian world. Moreover, they did not stand a chance to choose what they want to know because they know nothing besides what the community had taught them which

  1. gothic horror

    The reader also realises here, that they will never find out what or who was at the door: "The street lamp flickering opposite shone on a quiet deserted road." "The red room" is very different to the 'The Monkey's Paw' as it is told in first person and they both create suspense in its own ways.

  2. Iago has been called a motiveless malignity. Discuss your personal response in this.

    she shall not live: no, my heart is turned to stone; I strike it, and it hurts my hand. O, the world hath not a sweeter creature: she might lie by an emperor's side and command him tasks' Othello describes his hate towards Desdemona, but now he relises he loved

  1. How does Reginald Rose establish and maintain a sense of tension in Twelve Angry ...

    he is meant to be attending - begins to diffuse this tension by offering a fellow juror a stick of gum. This signifies the contrasting attitudes towards the case inside the room and as far as an opening line goes, it suggests that the rest of the play may take a more laid back attitude.

  2. Blackadder Media Coursework

    A slow, regular drum beat is played dring this, which is an ironic referenmce to the military 'call up'. It is also like the death knell of a funeral march or Darling's heartbeat. All these things indicate that something terrible is about to happen.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work