• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Some critics view the creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as a victim, others as an evil monster. Explore how the narration of both the creature and Frankenstein address the narrate on the issue of responsibility.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Some critics view the creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as a victim, others as an evil monster. Explore how the narration of both the creature and Frankenstein address the narrate on the issue of responsibility. The novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley is a fictitious debate about the difference between being a victim and being true evil in the society of the age. Mary Shelley's writing style is in much the same way as Frankenstein's scientific style. Where Frankenstein used many different body parts from many different corpses to build his creature, Mary Shelley used many different historical and writing contexts to build upon her novel. These contexts which she used in the novel included Darwin's theory, gothic horror genre, the advances in medicine and technology and even her own background. ...read more.

Middle

When looking at it he describes it as a 'wretch', because though he made it using body parts from beautiful people when all put together they showed off the horrid creatures shrivelled complexion. From what he thought would be the beauty of a dream, turned into that of breathless horror and disgust. Going on, Frankenstein feels that what he has done is totally wrong and starts regretting what he has done more and more calling his creation a 'miserable monster' and a demoniacal corpse. The way in which the book is written gives the reader a personal view of what the main characters feel. It gives an opportunity to give their own view on the responsibility towards the terrible events in the novel. ...read more.

Conclusion

You get to see a non-biased argument drawing the reader to the conclusion they deem true. In my opinion, I believe the creature was a victim to society, and not the monster he was seen as. When a baby is born it has the chance of a good life, the creature never got this. When he was created he was abandoned and everyone he saw rejected him socially due to his looks and his naivety towards society. In many ways he was a baby really, learning about life, but he had to learn the hard way as he did not have any parents to help him grow mentally. Instead he was built up from the anger and fear caused by the people that just rejected him from society and fuelled on this, he turned into his evil self, turning the anger and fear into hatred. Anthony Parisi 11 more ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Mary Shelley essays

  1. How does Mary Shelley present the creature in "Frankenstein"?

    lab notes and they revealed that he was just an unwanted experiment. As he continues his story the reader comes to realise that the creature wasn't evil from the beginning and he proves this by saving the young girl from drowning.

  2. Frankenstein's Monster: Monster or victim

    Victor is so disturbed by what happens that he falls into illness and has to be nursed back to health by his friend Henry Clerval. This is where he hears of William's murder and decides to travel back to home.

  1. Examine Mary Shelley's presentation of the relationship between Frankenstein and the creature!

    However, as the creature states, he is stronger and easily eludes Frankenstein. This in itself is surprising as, due to its past discrepancies, the reader has been led to believe that the creature would respond to Frankenstein's attack with a far more devastating one of his own.

  2. Sympathy for the Devil? How does Mary Shelley persuade the reader to pity ...

    "...the murder I have committed because I am forever robbed of all that she shall give me, she shall atone. The crime has its source in her; be hers the punishment!" The creature puts the blame on an innocent person even though he acknowledges that he is the murderer.

  1. HOW IS THE MONSTER PORTTRAYED IN CHAPTERS 11 TO 16 OF THE FRANKENSTEIN NOVEL?

    The monsters mind was of a good nature and more sophisticated then a regular human being. His intentions at first were righteous and positive; his feelings toward the world and its inhabitants were of amiability, refinement, generosity and courtesy. His feelings were undeniably fragile and delicate; in this case the saying 'don't judge a book by its cover' is acceptable.

  2. Some critics view the creature in Mary Shelley(TM)s Frankenstein as a victim, others as ...

    Prometheus tried to play god by making people come to live from clay and water. When Zeus found out, he punished him by chaining him to a rock where an eagle would come and feed on his liver everyday. They is a link between Prometheus and Frankenstein, they both tried

  1. Relationship Between Frankestein and the Creature.

    Lastly, consciously choosing to pursue his creation in vengeance, Frankenstein's sufferings are finally obliterated, for he was well aware that it might lead to his ultimate doom. The creation of an unloved being and the search for a death cure hold Victor Frankenstein more responsible for his own demise than the creation himself.

  2. Frankenstein's Creature: Monster or Victim

    Examples of this are: in August 1797 Mary was born and her parents had an ethical opposition to marriage but in March, 5 months earlier to her birth, they married to give their daughter 'social respectability'. This relates to 'Frankenstein' because marriage is portrayed as negative when Elizabeth gets killed after her and Victor marries.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work