• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Sonnet 130: The Meaning Analysis

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Sonnet 130: The Meaning Analysis On the face of it this poem looks like a love poem, but yet there is so much more hidden in the lines. One can initially analyse this poem by looking at each line to find out the true meaning. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; My mistress' eyes look nothing like the sun. This is the opening to the poem and on 1st reading it seems to mean the opposite of what Shakespeare may have intended. However this line sets the tone for the rest of the poem. Coral is far more red than her lips' red; Coral is far more red than her lips are red. If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If snow is white then her breasts are dull brown If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. ...read more.

Middle

But my mistress, when she walks, steps only on the ground And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare And yet, I think that my love is extraordinary, As any she belied with false compare. Like any other woman whom we falsely compare After reading the analysis under Shakespeare's sonnet we can see that this although upon first reading looks like a love sonnet, does not read like one. Shakespeare tells us that his mistress is not like anything found in nature. For instance her lips are not red enough comparable to coral, while her eyes are nothing like the sun. Here Shakespeare does not compare the mistress to nature which when you look at other sonnets you can find that it is a main topic that is used for comparison to. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another conclusion that can be drawn is that Shakespeare did not need to write a love poem because his love for his mistress was plain to see for all, and that even though she was no Goddess he still loved her anyway. The poem is therefore written to look down on others who write similar problems looking for proof of why they love each other and what they find themselves so attracted to. Shakespeare may have written this poem to show that he is not as shallow as other people and he does not need to have an attractive woman to be in love. All in all this is one of the most famous poems written by Shakespeare and it can be considered as being instantly recognisable by many when they hear the 1st line. With its humorous tone and hidden meaning it is subject to discussion what Shakespeare really meant when he wrote the poem. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Shakespeare's Sonnets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Shakespeare's Sonnets essays

  1. The Presentation of Women in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 and Griffin's Sonnet 39

    Also, he uses a technique to describe the parts from her hair, in a descending order, and to her body. Griffin's sonnet is quite similar to Shakespeare's sonnet 130, however, he presents the poem in a much powerful way which makes it sounds almost impossible to have such woman exists.

  2. Compare Sonnet 130 by Shakespeare and the Glasgow Sonnet by Edwin Morgan.

    we can see that the lace is falling apart with the line, 'the cracks deepen the rats crawl'. There are also examples of metaphors with, 'the kettle whimpers'. This kettle cant even whistle so all it can cope with is a whimper; just like the man barely being able to

  1. From the sonnets you have studied compare and comment upon three poems, explain why ...

    In this sonnet there are many metaphors: "My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand" Romeo uses the idea of his lips being pilgrims because he wants to touch Juliet with his hands and he says how pilgrim's hands are used for important cases just like lips are used for kissing.

  2. Discuss the effects of the writing in sonnet 63; showing how far and in ...

    However, the black shows that it simply will not live on as black is not usually seen naturally, as it is not a colour of living. Black, gives the sense of rotting and something far from immortal. This paradox of colour also suggests that the green of life will be preserved within the black writing.

  1. Discuss the use of sonnets through the ages.

    The poetic voice uses words that liken her to a saint. He uses words like "pale, heaven, goodness, love, white and sweetness." These words and many more show us how much he is trying to get across the message that he loves her.

  2. The Dark Lady in ShakespeareŒs Sonnets.

    But now is black beauty�s successive heir, And beauty slandered with a bastard shame. For since each hand hath put on Nature�s power, Fairing the foul with art�s false borrowed face, Sweet beauty hath no name, no holy bower, But is profaned, if not lives in disgrace.

  1. Shakespearian Love Sonnets.

    The man is in awe of the woman's beauty. This is structured as a fourteen line sonnet where alternate lines rhyme in three rhyming quatrains followed by a final rhyming couplet. Each line has ten syllables and is an iambic pentameter, which means that each line has five beats.

  2. Love in Romeo and Juliet and Sonnets 18, 29 and 130.

    This can be seen when he says that the lark rises from ?sullen earth? at the ?break of day?. This can be interpreted as just thinking about his lover brings him happiness and joy. The poet goes onto say how it ?sings hymns at heaven?s gate?.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work