• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Sonnet 130: The Meaning Analysis

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Sonnet 130: The Meaning Analysis On the face of it this poem looks like a love poem, but yet there is so much more hidden in the lines. One can initially analyse this poem by looking at each line to find out the true meaning. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; My mistress' eyes look nothing like the sun. This is the opening to the poem and on 1st reading it seems to mean the opposite of what Shakespeare may have intended. However this line sets the tone for the rest of the poem. Coral is far more red than her lips' red; Coral is far more red than her lips are red. If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If snow is white then her breasts are dull brown If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. ...read more.

Middle

But my mistress, when she walks, steps only on the ground And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare And yet, I think that my love is extraordinary, As any she belied with false compare. Like any other woman whom we falsely compare After reading the analysis under Shakespeare's sonnet we can see that this although upon first reading looks like a love sonnet, does not read like one. Shakespeare tells us that his mistress is not like anything found in nature. For instance her lips are not red enough comparable to coral, while her eyes are nothing like the sun. Here Shakespeare does not compare the mistress to nature which when you look at other sonnets you can find that it is a main topic that is used for comparison to. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another conclusion that can be drawn is that Shakespeare did not need to write a love poem because his love for his mistress was plain to see for all, and that even though she was no Goddess he still loved her anyway. The poem is therefore written to look down on others who write similar problems looking for proof of why they love each other and what they find themselves so attracted to. Shakespeare may have written this poem to show that he is not as shallow as other people and he does not need to have an attractive woman to be in love. All in all this is one of the most famous poems written by Shakespeare and it can be considered as being instantly recognisable by many when they hear the 1st line. With its humorous tone and hidden meaning it is subject to discussion what Shakespeare really meant when he wrote the poem. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Shakespeare's Sonnets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Shakespeare's Sonnets essays

  1. Compare and contrast the two sonnets "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" ...

    to be seriously convincing and romantic. Whereas, he has written 'Sonnet 130' to be more humorous and critical rather than serious and romantic. 'Shall I compare thee...' is over exaggerated and quite unrealistic, due to the supernatural element of the women that is used. However, 'Sonnet 130' is much more realistic and convincing than 'Shall I compare thee...'

  2. The Power of Love: Truth, Nature or Society? "Sonnet 67" by Edmund Spencer ...

    does the reader realize the fact that in actuality the woman is in control. The character in "Sonnet 130" had no reason to love his mistress, and it is very appropriate that her external features gave him no pleasure because this makes a bold statement that love is not based on beauty.

  1. Compare Sonnet 130 by Shakespeare and the Glasgow Sonnet by Edwin Morgan.

    The way in which this is done by Shakespeare is by firstly mentioning something that is of natural beauty and then saying that his wife is the complete opposite. An example in which Shakespeare does this is when he says 'if snow be white, why then her breasts are dun'.

  2. The Presentation of Women in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 and Griffin's Sonnet 39

    it cannot be gold and he have seen roses "damask'd" but never seen roses blooming from his mistress's cheeks. Shakespeare is very strong and definite when speaking and stating the truths of his mistress. It is also because of his decisive characteristic that makes the mistress real in nature.

  1. Discuss the effects of the writing in sonnet 63; showing how far and in ...

    The use of "black...green" creates the picture of black being dark and a colour which is heavily associated with death. This shows the Young Man will actually stay "green" meaning he will stay youthful and living. Also like spring's association with the colour green, will be there, immortally, as the season's change the colour green will be seen again.

  2. Discuss the use of sonnets through the ages.

    The poetic voice uses words that liken her to a saint. He uses words like "pale, heaven, goodness, love, white and sweetness." These words and many more show us how much he is trying to get across the message that he loves her.

  1. The Dark Lady in ShakespeareŒs Sonnets.

    131.12 In this case he might have wanted to show that even if his mistress is no beauty of her time his love for her is very strong. That Shakespeare disagrees with the existing ideal of beauty sonnet 127 might tell: In the old age black was not counted fair, 127 Or if it were, it bore not beauty´s name.

  2. Love in Romeo and Juliet and Sonnets 18, 29 and 130.

    He says in line 10 that when he thinks about his love he thinks about ?thee and then my state? and then in the last line, he says ?scorn to change my state?. In the first of the two quotes, he is referring to his emotional well-being, rather than his

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work