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Sonnet 130: The Meaning Analysis

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Introduction

Sonnet 130: The Meaning Analysis On the face of it this poem looks like a love poem, but yet there is so much more hidden in the lines. One can initially analyse this poem by looking at each line to find out the true meaning. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; My mistress' eyes look nothing like the sun. This is the opening to the poem and on 1st reading it seems to mean the opposite of what Shakespeare may have intended. However this line sets the tone for the rest of the poem. Coral is far more red than her lips' red; Coral is far more red than her lips are red. If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If snow is white then her breasts are dull brown If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. ...read more.

Middle

But my mistress, when she walks, steps only on the ground And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare And yet, I think that my love is extraordinary, As any she belied with false compare. Like any other woman whom we falsely compare After reading the analysis under Shakespeare's sonnet we can see that this although upon first reading looks like a love sonnet, does not read like one. Shakespeare tells us that his mistress is not like anything found in nature. For instance her lips are not red enough comparable to coral, while her eyes are nothing like the sun. Here Shakespeare does not compare the mistress to nature which when you look at other sonnets you can find that it is a main topic that is used for comparison to. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another conclusion that can be drawn is that Shakespeare did not need to write a love poem because his love for his mistress was plain to see for all, and that even though she was no Goddess he still loved her anyway. The poem is therefore written to look down on others who write similar problems looking for proof of why they love each other and what they find themselves so attracted to. Shakespeare may have written this poem to show that he is not as shallow as other people and he does not need to have an attractive woman to be in love. All in all this is one of the most famous poems written by Shakespeare and it can be considered as being instantly recognisable by many when they hear the 1st line. With its humorous tone and hidden meaning it is subject to discussion what Shakespeare really meant when he wrote the poem. ...read more.

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