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Sonnet 19 and 63 consider the destructive nature of time and the effect on the man's beauty. Compare and contrast the two sonnets focusing on the poet's intention and use of language and structure.

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Introduction

Sonnet 19 and 63 consider the destructive nature of time and the effect on the man's beauty. Compare and contrast the two sonnets focusing on the poet's intention and use of language and structure. In this essay I am going to compare and contrast sonnet 19 and 63 focusing on the poets intention and use of language and structure considering the destructive nature of time theme and the effect on the mans beauty. Sonnet 19 is about the destructive power of time and in, which is very explicit in this particular sonnet. The sonnet is based upon the personification of time used by Shakespeare. Sonnet 63's theme is again about time and personifies time and performs beauty as an image. In Sonnet 19 Shakespeare represents Time as wild animals, like Lions and Tigers, because these animals are powerful just like Time. For example "Devouring Time blunt thou the Lion's paws". This quote portrays Time as an animal devouring its prey - Time is the animal and the young mans beauty is the animals prey. Shakespeare uses Time as a hunting killing machine. Another reference to wild animals is "Pluck the keen teeth from the fierce tiger's jaws". Time is portrayed as destructive and at some stage in the poets young friend he will become blunt and time will take away its ability to survive therefore destructive power is being torn away which emphasis's on times power. ...read more.

Middle

Sonnet 19 and 63 both suggest the use of personification with the intention of time being stolen, "Him in thy course untainted do allow," interprets the swift progress of time being stolen. "Stealing away the treasure of his spring," this quote suggests that beauty have being taken away although time is the thief in this interpretation. In sonnet 19 and 63 there is a contrast between birth and death. In sonnet 19 future generations is discussed, "For beauty's pattern to succeeding men," the new generations will have something to model against with his existing beauty, Shakespeare is talking about a young man and persuading him to hand his beauty on by having children. Where as in sonnet 63 Shakespeare discusses death and its defence against time, "Against confounding age's cruel knife That he shall never cut from memory" time is inevitable towards death with a war like image using a defence barrier. "Age's steepy night," with an interpretation to declining death. In sonnet 19 the final rhyming couplet as the end of the sonnet, "Yet do thy worst old Time: despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse ever live young." This quote to me is similar in a way to the rhyming couplet in sonnet 63. However this couplet defines that the poets poems will preserve his feelings for love. ...read more.

Conclusion

In both sonnets there is a change in tone. In sonnet 19 the tone changes during the second quatrain, "But I forbid thee one most heinous crime," and also in sonnet 63 there is a turn in the couplet "His beauty shall in these black lines be seen, And they shall live, and he in them still green." A sonnet is recognised as a poem that consists of fourteen lines split up into quatrains having ten syllables in each line and ends with a rhyming couplet. In sonnet 19 the first quatrain Shakespeare discusses the implications of the power of time and how nothing or no body can prevent this. In the second quatrain the mans beauty is displayed by imagery by Shakespeare and the third quatrain discusses the future generations and the persuasion and consequences of having children to extend his beauty. In sonnet 63 the first quatrain discusses the personification of time and strength towards beauty. The second quatrain suggests the imagery of beauty similarly to sonnet 19's second quatrain. Finally the third quatrains a turn in the tome and suggests the theme is defence against time memories and death. In both sonnets there is a regular rhyme scheme using the iambic pentameter, there is a current flow in both sonnets with a theme connected to each quatrain. Concluding there is many similarities and differences between the two sonnets throughout imagery, intention, language and structure, mainly more comparisons and similarities rather than differences and contrasts. ...read more.

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