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Study of William Blake's Poems of Experience

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Introduction

Study of William Blake's Poems of Experience Most of William Blake's poetry that I have studied has had a major theme or themes such as religion or oppression and usually his poems also use symbolism to get across the point. I am going to study closer two poems: The Tiger and A Poison Tree. The Tiger is a very famous poem and is one of the more popular poems written by Blake. I feel that the poem is about religion, creation and the French Revolution, which took place in France around the time, that Blake was writing these poems. I think that the Tiger itself is a personification of evil, which you could say is the French Revolution as many Europeans thought that the revolution was an evil thing. The animal, the Tiger is also a very strong, ferocious animal that hunts its prey very well. Again there are connections with the revolution, which was very strong and ferocious and did not stop until it got what it wanted like a tiger doesn't stop until it gets its prey. The poem starts of by saying that the Tiger is 'burning', which I thinks means that the revolution is alive and burning. ...read more.

Middle

This subtle change gives a lasting effect on the reader. I believe that it means that now the revolution is so powerful that who dares to oppose it not just who could implying that there is no one brave enough to fight against it and it will surely grow out of control very quickly. A Poison Tree is another fairly famous poem by Blake and I think that it is very symbolic and important. I think that this poem is about hate of another person and human evil. I believe that the tree that Blake refers to is the tree in the story of Adam and Eve in the Old Testament and the poison is the knowledge of that tree in the story. So is Blake trying to say that knowledge is poisonous? Today this is a very common concept as many people say knowledge can be dangerous and many people have wondered how people are the happiest when they are young, unaware and without much knowledge. The first verse has a very simple meaning and Blake speaks of how one should tell their feelings especially bad ones to the other party involved instead of holding them in and letting them grow. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 'London' there is also a feeling of oppression, 'mind - forged manacles' which also relates to the French Revolution, which I think is one of the main themes in 'The Tiger'. In the poem, 'London' there is a sense of death and poverty, which could have come from the fact that Blake himself came form a poor background and used to live in the poorer areas of North London where poverty, death and disease were rife. 'Holy Thursday' is another poem where Blake talks of the poverty in this country. In this poem he addresses it almost directly and he says that in this great land how come there are still so many poor people for whom it is so difficult to even find food. The final major theme is religion and Blake seems to bring this into almost all of his poems. In 'The Tiger' he speaks of how God created the 'tiger' and he speaks a lot on heaven like in the poem, 'Ah! Sunflower.' Here he speaks of the long journey of life and finally when the journey is over one can go into the sweet relaxation of heaven and is finally free of the burdens of life. Although Blake's poems are very complicated I think that Blake is a very good poet and he seems to relate many of his poems with issues of his times and his feelings at the time. Rushil Patel 10D ...read more.

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