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Super natural in Shakespeare's plays.

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Introduction

Super natural in Shakespeare's plays In the time of William Shakespeare there was a strong belief in the existence of the supernatural. Thus, the supernatural is a recurring aspect in many of Mr. Shakespeare�s plays. In two such plays, Hamlet and Macbeth, the supernatural is an integral part of the structure of the plot. It provides a catalyst for action, an insight into character, and augments the impact of many key scenes. The supernatural appears to the audience in many varied forms. In Hamlet there appears perhaps the most notable of the supernatural forms, the ghost. However, in Macbeth, not only does a ghost appear but a floating dagger, witches, and prophetic apparitions make appearances. The role of the supernatural is very important in Hamlet and Macbeth. A ghost, appearing in the form of Hamlet�s father, makes several appearances in the play. It first appears to the watchmen, Marcellus and Bernardo, along with Horatio near the guardsmens' post. ...read more.

Middle

In this scene the ghost makes an appearance to �whet� Hamlet�s �almost blunted purpose�. Hamlet is now convinced of the ghost and he no longer harbors any suspicion. He now listens to it, �Speak to her, Hamlet�. In Hamlet, the supernatural is the guiding force behind Hamlet. The ghost ask Hamlet to seek revenge for the King�s death and Hamlet is thus propelled to set into action a series of events that ends in Hamlet�s death. The supernatural occurs four times during the course of Macbeth. It occurs in all the appearances of the witches, in the appearance of Banquo�s ghost, in the apparitions with their prophesies, and in the �air-drawn� dagger that guides Macbeth towards his victim. Of the supernatural phenomenon evident in Macbeth the witches are perhaps the most important. The witches represent Macbeth�s evil ambitions. They are the catalyst which unleash Macbeth�s evil aspirations. Macbeth believes the witches and wishes to know more about the future so after the banquet he seeks them out at their cave. ...read more.

Conclusion

It shows the level that Macbeth�s mind has recessed to. When he sees the ghost he reacts with horror and upsets the guests. Macbeth wonders why murder had taken place many times in the past before it was prevented by law -�statute purged the gentle weal�- and yet the dead are coming back. The final form of the supernatural is the �air-drawn� dagger which leads Macbeth to his victim. When the dagger appears to him, Macbeth finally becomes victim to the delusions of his fevered brain. The dagger points to Duncan�s room and appears to be covered in blood. The dagger buttresses the impact of this key scene in which Macbeth slays King Duncan. The supernatural is a recurring aspect in many of the plays by William Shakespeare. In Hamlet and Macbeth the supernatural is an integral part of the structure of the plot. In these plays the supernatural provides a catalyst for action by the characters. It supplies insight into the major players and it augments the impact of many key scenes. The supernatural appeals to the audience�s curiosity of the mysterious and thus strengthens their interest. ...read more.

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