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Symbolisation In the Lord Of The Flies

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Introduction

English Coursework Piece Symbolisation In the Lord Of The Flies Lord of the Flies has more than one "theme," or meaning, but the overall and most important one is that the conditions of life within society are closely related to the moral integrity of its individual members. The theme is an attempt to trace the defects of society back to the defects of human nature. The moral is that the shape of a society must depend on the ethical nature of the individual and not on any political system however apparently logical or respectable. The whole book is symbolic in nature except the rescue in the end where adult life appears, dignified and capable, but in reality entangled in the same evil as the symbolic life of the children on the island. The officer, having interrupted a man-hunt, prepares to take the children off the island in a ship which will be hunting its enemy in the same way. And who will rescue the adult and his ship? Although this is the main idea of the story, others exist underneath it. ...read more.

Middle

Jack, who, throughout the novel seems to remove the forces opposing him like Simon who had just found out about the beast and Samneric, he is afraid of Piggy and eventually kills him to eliminate his moral influence and foresight on the group. The Conch is a symbol of law and democracy. Used to call meetings, it is magical to the boys, who for the most part respect it. In the end, when it is destroyed, authority on the island is gone and Ralph is left to fend for himself. The Signal Fire is a representation of commonsense and rescue from the island which is portrayed to be hell in the end. When the signal fire can no longer be lit, because Jack stole Piggy's glasses that light it, its beacon of hope and knowledge is no longer present to guide Ralph who must then be constantly reminded by Piggy about what is right and after the ship passes marks the momnet when Jack and Ralph part ways and become hated rivals "Not even Ralph knew how a link between him and Jack had been snapped and fastened elsewhere." ...read more.

Conclusion

Sam and Eric are also interested in the good working order, since they need amity with the group similar to the one that the two brothers maintain. The strength of their union is idealized to the extent of being considered an only person. It is so explicit that the kids on the island even call them by a single name: Samneric. We can also outstand other features in their character like being subdued to the leader. Firstly they accept the order of the shell, but later on their lives overcome their honour and they finally betray Ralph. Their betrayal is due to their innocence, but their act could be seen within the adult world as a sign of cowardliness and interest. The adult world appears finally in the book with the coming of the officer, an officer which is taking part in a real war. He is surprised of finding a burning island, but he is still proud of being a soldier who also contributes on a nuclear war which is destroying the whole world. So I think that the events on the island are mirrored in real life off on the island as the world is slowly destroying itself much like the boys are on the island. ...read more.

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