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Symbolism in Lord of the Flies

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Introduction

Lord of the Flies Essay By Kewal Pradhan E. Sgouromitis English Period A December 19, 2002 In the novel, Lord of the Flies, symbolism played an important part in the development of story. The use of symbolism in objects develops the structure and meaning of the novel. Some examples of symbolism in objects are the pig's head, Piggy's glasses, the Conch and the Fire. One of the most important and most obvious symbols in Lord of the Flies is the object that gives the novel its name, the pig's head. The pig's head, in this novel, is described as "dim-eyed, grinning faintly, blood blackening between the teeth," and the "obscene thing" is covered with a "black blob of flies" that "tickled under his nostrils." (Pg. 151, 152). As a result of this detailed, striking image, the reader becomes aware of the great evil and darkness represented by the Lord of the Flies. ...read more.

Middle

For example, at one of their first meetings, the boys decide that they "can't have everybody talking at once" and that they "have to have 'Hands up' like at school." (Pg. 36). However, after some time, the hunters become more concerned with slaughtering a pig than with being rescued and returning to civilization. When they return from a successful hunt in the jungle, Ralph and Piggy try to explain to the hunters that having meat for their meals is not as important as keeping the signal fire burning. In a following fight, Jack knocks Piggy's specs from his face, smashing one of the lenses against the mountain rocks and greatly impairing his vision (pg. 75, 78). Finally, after Jack forms his own tribe of savages, Piggy's specs are stolen, leaving him nearly blind (pg. 154). Meanwhile, Jack returns to Castle Rock, "trotting steadily, exulting in his achievement," as he has practically abandoned Ralph and his civilized life (pg. ...read more.

Conclusion

These fires symbolize a hope for rescue and a return to order and civilization. When the fire was burning bright, it was because the boys were working hard to get rescued. When the fire burnt out, it was because boys, like Jack, didn't care about being rescued. When the fire went out, Ralph lost track of himself, unsure of his next move. The fire is opposed to hunting, the activity of anarchy on the island. In the end, the fire that got them rescued was not meant for rescue. It was there because Jack was burning down the island to kill Ralph. In conclusion, Lord of the Flies is a story that shows the dark, fading life that results from mankind's natural capacity for evil, which is allowed to control humans when they are freed from the rules of society. Throughout the novel, Golding uses many different objects as symbols to illustrate this theme. Some of those objects would be insignificant in real life. However, in Lord of the Flies, each of the previously mentioned symbols is vital to the story's theme. ...read more.

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