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Symbolism in Lord of the Flies.

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Introduction

Symbolism in Lord of the Flies In William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies, Golding uses seemingly ordinary objects to symbolize ideas or concepts that help to reveal the themes of the novel. The boys stranded on the island come into contact with such objects. Through the use of these symbols, Golding demonstrates that all humans have an evil nature somewhere inside them and at some point and time they let it come into existence. KjbG0 Visit coursework cc in cc fo cc for cc more project cc Do cc not cc redistribute KjbG0 The conch shell is the first important discovery the boys find on the island. ...read more.

Middle

Jack even says to Ralph, "The conch doesn't count at this end of the island." (150) When Roger pushes the rock of the ledge that kills Piggy, it also shatters the conch shell. This represents the end of all law and order on the island.cocb cbr secbcbw orcb cbk incb focb cb. One of the most obvious symbols in Lord of the Flies is the object that gives the novel its name, the pig's head. Goulding gives a description of the head that makes the reader become aware of the evil its represents. The name Lord of the Flies is a translation of the name Beelzebub, which is a name for Satan. ...read more.

Conclusion

(36) In reality, the Beast represents the evil naturally present within everyone. Simon realizes this even before his conversation with the Lord of the Flies and during an argument about the Beast he tries to tell the boys. He reluctantly says, "Maybe there is a beast...What I mean is...maybe it's only us." But no one agrees with him, so as the boys grow more and more savage their belief in the Beast grows stronger. Towards the end of the novel they are even leaving sacrifices for it.coea ear seeaeaw orea eak inea foea ea. This entire novel is symbolic of the nature of man and society in general. Without all of these symbols, the story would not have the same effect as it did with the symbols. Golding cleverly used many everyday objects and made them a vital part to the story's theme. ...read more.

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