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Symbolism In The Great Gatsby.

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Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� 8:����7�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0<0bjbj�2�2 (<�X�X�%�������������������8� ���v\^^^^^^$SR��������***��\*\**<��< `mpRA���<\�0�<1 1 <������1 �< *��* �� Symbolism In The Great Gatsby [Abstract]: The Great Gatsby is well-known as the most mature work of Fitzgerald. Symbolism, as a unique artistic technique, is the connection relation between symbols and meanings. This article, based on the definition of symbolism, explains the function of symbolism in The Great Gatsby. [Key-words]:symbolism Fitzgerald Introduction The two decades between World War I and World War II were a golden age of American fiction. Fitzgerald, as a member of ��the lost generation��, publish his The Great Gatsby in 1925 and confirmed his status as a chronicler and poet laureate in the jazz age. He was once credited by T. S. Eliot for ��the first step that American fiction has taken since Henry James, because Fitzgerald depicted the extolled grandest and most boisterous, reckless and merry-making scene�� through what he knew or indirectly experienced and discovered the disillusionment that ��a generation grown up to find all gods dead, all wars fought, all faith in man shaken��, what��s more, he depicted the postwar unprecedented boom of material revelry and at the same time presented the disappointment of the postwar generation for America, the concern for the loss of conventional values and ideals, and the regret for the disillusionment of American Dream. ...read more.

Middle

Therefore car becomes the symbol of ruin, implying the disillusionment of ideals based on material. 2. The symbolic meanings of various scenes are also elaborately endowed. Scene description is to describe the environment of characters in an imaginative way to spur certain imagery reflection. Fitzgerald excelled in impressing people deeply by the application of a series of colors. At Nick��s first arrival at Buchanas mansion, there was ��a bright rosycolored space�� in front of him. ��The windows were ajar and gleaming white against the fresh grass outside that seemed to grow a little way into the house. A breeze blew though the room, blew curtains in at one end and out the other like pale flags twisting them up toward the frosted wedding-cake of the ceiling, and then rippled over the wine-colored rug, making a shadow on it as wind does on the sea.�� Daisy and Jordan ��were both in white, and their dresses were rippling and fluttering as if they had just been blown back in after a short flight around the house.�� In this scene, there are a lot of sensual hues, such as rosy colour, white(clothes or cake), green(glass), wine-color, and blue(sea), constituting an imagist picture in which the most noticeable are the two ladies in white. White is the symbol of purity and in Gatsby��s eyes, Daisy ��in white�� is the pure goddess and his restless puisuit. ...read more.

Conclusion

sublimation, as Howard Woolf said, ��Fitzgerald is the spokesman and epitome of his generation, not satisfied with status quo, and of our generation as well.�� This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ �-�-�-�-n.o.�.�.R/S/�/�/6070;0<0������������h3#�h3#�OJQJh3#�h3#�CJOJQJ%h3#�h3#�OJQJfHq� ����)h3#�h3#�CJOJQJfHq� ����h3#�h�&� h�&�h3#�%&()*,-O P r s u v � ' ( ��������`�����������������������������gd�&��-;0��`aZ[./�#�#~$$�&�&�&�&�+�+�+�-�-�-�-�-�-�-.o.���������������������������$a$gd3#�gd�&�o.p.q.r.�.�.�.�.S/T/U/V/�/�/�/�/708090:0;0<0���������������������gd�&�$a$gd3#�$a$gd3#�&1�h:p�&���/ ��=!�'"�'#��$��%��D@�D NormalCJ_H aJmH nHsH tHDA@�D Default Paragraph FontRi�R Table Normal�4� l4�a� (k�(No ListDZ@�D �&� Plain TextCJOJQJ^JaJ4@4 3#�Header ���!4 @4 3#�Footer ���!`�o"` 3#�watermark header$a$CJOJQJfHq� ����N�o2N 3#�watermark footer$a$ CJOJQJ<(<����r�V�:��<0`o.<0;0�%=(��alex�3#��&��@�%�<(P@��Unknown������������G��z ��Times New Roman5V��Symbol3&� �z ��Arial7&� � �VerdanaG5�� �����h�MS Mincho-�3� fg?5� �z ��Courier New"1���h[Ӵ�[Ӵ�[Ӵ� �� ��$�������4�%�%3�� H�?�������������������&��� TCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedalexalex�� ��Oh��+'��0`��� |�� �� ( 4@HPX� sUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedualexewoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedu>Downloaded from Coursework.Info - http://www.coursework.info/is Normal.dotfalexl.d2exMicrosoft Word 10.0@@�!>A��@�!>A��@�!>A�� ��� ��Õ.��+,��D��Õ.��+,��`���H����� ���� � ��UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedo�%��%A Titled@���+K_PID_LINKBASE CopyrightDownloaded FromCan RedistributeOwner�A4http://www.coursework.comcoursework.comehttp://www.coursework.com -No, do not redistributecoursework.com/ ���� !"#$%&����()*+,-.����0123456��������9��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Root Entry�������� �F���RA��;�1Table��������WordDocument��������(<SummaryInformation(����'DocumentSummaryInformation8������������/CompObj������������j������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���� �FMicrosoft Word Document MSWordDocWord.Document.8�9�q ...read more.

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