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Sympathy towards Pip in Great Expectations

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Introduction

Great Expectations In Great Expectations Dickens uses different techniques to deliberately create sympathy for the character Pip in his opening exchanges with Miss Havisham and Estella. This essay will analyse and reflect on the ways in which Charles Dickens does this. The first meeting between Pip and Miss Havisham is arranged by Mr Pumblechook (Pip's uncle) when he hears that Miss Havisham wants a boy to go round and play. Pip being a member of the working class is obliged to go as the working class feel pressure on them to please the upper class in this case Miss Havisham. In Dickens's time the working class were not treated fairly by the upper class but the working class was expected to please the upper classes. Dickens was born into a working class family and like many other working class children he received no schooling. Dickens wanted to make something of himself because he knew what it was like to be working class and how the upper class would treat lower classes. ...read more.

Middle

Come close.' Miss Havisham then becomes very interrogative, probing him with questions such as: 'Are you sullen and obstinate?' Miss Havisham being upper class speaks down on Pip and treats him like her pet ordering him about, getting him to do things that he doesn't really want to do (such as 'play'); we know he doesn't want to be there as he politely says ' I am very sorry for you, and very sorry I can't play just now.' Miss Havishams house, also knew as the Satis House, is a typical upper class house but with a twist; like Miss Havisham it has been cut of from the real world, all the window are boarded up so inside there's not even a glimpse of daylight. Inside the house everything has been left to rot; as Pip describes it '.which ought to be white had been long ago, and had lost its lustre, and was faded and yellow.' The description of the house and everything in it relates to its owner, Miss Havisham; rotting away with an eerie nature. ...read more.

Conclusion

It would be hard for Pip to please Miss Havisham, as she has a personal vendetta against the opposite sex. Ever since her heart was broken by her Fianc´┐Ż she has wanted to take revenge out on a male, and unfortunately she as decided to take her stress, towards the opposite sex, out on Pip, therefore we would feel sorry for Pip as he is trying his best to make a good impression but is finding it quite a struggle. Dickens purposefully writes Great Expectations in first person from Pips point of view so we can understand what this poor young boy is going through therefore making us feel sorry for him. In conclusion I think Dickens has been very successful in making the reader feel sympathetic towards Pip. Dickens achieves this by using a variety of techniques. From the way he expresses how this poor boy Pip has been unwillingly sent to an eerie rotting old house, to the different types of dialogue the two classes use and how the upper class look down upon the working class. Every event uses certain techniques and has been purposefully planned out by Charles Dickens to create sympathy towards the main character Pip. ...read more.

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