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Taking into consideration the social and theatrical context of the play, what is interesting about Shakespeare's presentation of the "Star - cross'd lovers" in Romeo and Juliet.

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Introduction

Taking into consideration the social and theatrical context of the play, what is interesting about Shakespeare's presentation of the "Star - cross'd lovers" in Romeo and Juliet One of William Shakespeare's most renowned plays is the tragedy, Romeo and Juliet. The plot revolves around the complexities of love, conflict and fate amongst a 16th century society. In this essay I am aiming to explore, analyse and discuss the social and theatrical aspects of the play, alongside the various types of language used to entertain a wider audience. Shakespeare introduced Romeo and Juliet with a prologue. This was an important part of the plays structure as it set the scene and outlined the plot. It was read out in order to help the less educated peasants in the audience to understand what was going to happen. The public enjoyed Shakespeare's use of clever puns and linguistic devices adding excitement to the plot and transforming characters so as to give a magical air to the performance. ...read more.

Middle

It is very interesting how rapidly and significantly Romeo's attitude changes towards life through the power of love. You can see through how he presents language that he has changed dramatically, for example when he falls out of love with Rosaline, the way he speaks makes it feel as Romeo could even be thinking of giving up love, but within a matter of days after having been at the capulets party he meets Juliet who boosts his spirits and realises he shouldn't give up passion after all, "I'll go along no such site to be shown, but to rejoice in splendour of my own". To portray this change of feelings, Shakespeare uses different types of language such as, metaphoric, romantic and creating macrocosm, "it is the East and Juliet is the sun", and example of all these techniques. The effects of this language gives an instant impression that Romeo has never loved anyone as much as Juliet and is very glad that he didn't decide to give up love, also this suggests how highly he holds Juliet she is clearly very important to him. ...read more.

Conclusion

All of the latter is interesting about Juliet especially that she reacted in exactly the same way as Romeo, where both their attitudes change so fast. In the Globe theatre I would have actors direct the clever language and funny puns towards the peasants as they are more down to earth and generally find it more amusing than the higher class as they would speak publicly about such things and may even be offended. On the other hand if there was a more romantic or poetic line to be spoken, "O Romeo, Romeo. Where for art thou Romeo?" This would, without a doubt, be directed to the wealthier audience. If Shakespeare was to use a pun, it would have been expressed in an amusing way to try and get the spectators involved, but if there was a more figurative or poetic line it would be told in a formal and passionate way as the higher class would find this more interesting than getting involved. ...read more.

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