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Talk about some of the ways Charles Dickens tries to interest the reader in chapter one and two of 'Great Expectations'. What does the reader learn about what life was like in the Victorian period from these two chapters?

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Introduction

Talk about some of the ways Charles Dickens tries to interest the reader in chapter one and two of 'Great Expectations'. What does the reader learn about what life was like in the Victorian period from these two chapters? Charles Dickens was born in 1812 (19th century), during the Victorian period. He wrote 'Great Expectations' (novel) between 1860 and 1861 in 36 weekly instalments in order to interest his readers. Each weekly part had to sell and also it had to interest the reader. It was Victorian equivalent of a soap drama. Charles Dickens was like a modern soap opera writer, because he wrote about the problems and crimes, which were going on in those days' society. 'Great Expectations' is written from the point of view of a young innocent boy whose five siblings are dead. ...read more.

Middle

"Five little stone lozenges ...memory of the five little brothers of mine who gave up trying to get a living." This draws the reader's attention to Pip feeling isolated. Dickens also shows this isolation by saying that Pip is getting a vivid picture of his father and mother, whom Pip has never seen. This makes the reader to feel sorry for Pip as a young aged boy who has no image of his parents, as photographs weren't invented then. "Their days were long before the days of photograph." Charles Dickens highlights the danger of Pip's environment and his weakness to his surrounding by through the descriptions of the landscape. Dickens uses threatening metaphors like "Low leaden line" and "Savage lair". These threats hint and prepare the reader for other incidents later on in the book. ...read more.

Conclusion

Chapter one ends with Pip announcing his fear "Now I was frightened again", bringing a sense of reality to the chapter, then Pip 'running home without stopping'. This leaves the chapter full of mystery and encourages the audience to read on and find out about what happens to Pip. In chapter two, the scene of the story is set in a kitchen and this is where Pip's sister and his husband are introduced. Dickens spends the first paragraph of this chapter to describe the personality of Pip's sister, "Knowing her to have a hard and heavy hand" and "To be much in the habit of laying her hand upon her husband as well as upon me". By the end of the first paragraph of chapter two, we know that Pip's sister is a violent person who believes in 'Child should be seen and not heard'. ?? ?? ?? ?? Shahab Nejad English Course work Great Expectations ...read more.

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